Posts for June 2006

CALL FOR ENTRIES : Mobile&DMB Fest 2006

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Kangok Lee:

CALL FOR ENTRIES : Mobile&DMB Fest 2006

Mobile&DMB Fest 2006 is open for entries of the competition section Mobile Express for international works as well as Korean works. Organized by Seoul Moving Image Forum and presented by Seoul Film Festival Executive Committee, Mobile&DMB Fest is trying to introduce brilliant works through New Media such as mobile and DMB. We sincerely hope you consider this an exciting opportunity to show your great endeavors in the new environment of digital art works.

WHEN : September 8 - 30, 2006 Screening of Competition Section and Out-of-Competition Section

WHERE : Mobile and DMB (broadcasting channel to be confirmed) SeNef website and Media Lounge, Supporting organizations¡¯ and sponsors¡¯ website, portal site

Mobile&DMB Fest 2006 SUBMISSION DEADLINE : July 28, 2006 (Arrived)

ELIGIBILITY For the competition section, only works completed after January 2005 may be submitted to the festival. Submissions should be creative works produced or adopted through digital technology. There will be no restrictions regarding genre or subject matter of the work and all types of works, including fiction, documentary, experimental, music video, animation, motion graphic, flash animation, game, web-art, etc. will be accepted. Running time should be under 20 minutes.

MATERIALS REQUIRED FOR SUBMISSIONS : 1)Application Form (available at http://www.senef.net) 2)1 still picture and 1 photo of director (300 dpi JPG file)

3)Preview material (VHS-Tape, DV 6mm, DVD, CD, File-Transferring or URL address for preview) * For File-Transferring indications, please contact us to program3@senef.net Contacts Mobile&DMB Fest 2006 Program Dept. (135-090) 5F, Youahn Bldg. 146-23 Samsung-Dong, Kangnam-Gu, Seoul, Korea Tel. 82-2-518-4332 / Fax. 82-2-518-4333

program3@senef.net http://www.senef.net

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Kangok Lee


A Global Goalllllll

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American artist Jon Winet often uses new media to comment on contemporary media culture. He's previously immersed himself in the realms of soap operas and political campaigns, in collaboration with Margaret Crane, and in his newest endeavor he takes on the mega media spectacle that is the World Cup. 'Goal 2006' leverages the international attention directed at this sporting event to raise awareness of deeper issues related to globalization. The project takes many forms, including a multilingual website, an SMS/MMS project, and an exhibition to be held June 26-July 5, at Stuttgart, Germany's Rocker 33|Dialekt. The website revolves around 'a virtual football card in 64 versions, featuring updates and RSS media feeds for the participating FIFA countries, original video, audio and photography, and field reports worldwide.' The site successfully mimics the rich, celebratory design style of any other sports page, but each player's card is accompanied by reports of environmental and social challenges specific to that locale, as a result of globalization. The SMS/MMS project allows for phone-based daily downloads and rich text messages with similar information. The sign-up page for this service refers to it as 'media research,' thus implicating Winet's audience in his broader study of the products and processes of media consumption. - Marisa Olson

http://www.goal2006.net/

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


Picamotics

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picomatic.gif

Individually Reactive Space

PICAMOTICS is conceived as an individual public navigation system in which an individual's presence and movement in a space is interpreted and responded to by the system. The resulting 'individually reactive space' knows its visitors. Tracking their positions it can follow movements and draw conclusions from individual behaviours.

Picomotics is also referred to as a "collaborative platform for interactive surroundings". In addition to navigation, proposed applications include educational scenarios where individuals are assigned attributes which, when they interact with others, demonstrate abstract concepts in a playful and social manner.

ipunkt.gif

For example, "visitors represent basic mathematic operations such as division, multiplication etc. by walking through a field of numbers. If, for example, the visitor representing an addition of 8 meets the visitor representing a division by 2, the result of their meeting will be 4. Abstract laws of mathematics become tangible."

The system uses infrared camera tracking from above. The floor becomes a trackpad and display. Audio "sound showers" can also be supported. ipunkt (second image) is a similar responsive navigation system with a bit more depth on the development process.

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Originally posted on networked_performance by michelle


[Marshall McLuhan's legendary interview on the Dick Cavett Show in December 1970]

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mcluhan-1.jpg

Marshall McLuhan's legendary interview on the Dick Cavett Show in December 1970.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


Public Domain Blog

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Mitch Featherston’s daily public domain image blog is a wonderful treat. Each image Mitch posts tells a story or gives a taste of a different time, and many are useful resources for artists and designers. It’s one of my favourite blogs and I recommend it highly.

Take a look here:

http://opendomain.blogspot.com/


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Originally posted on robmyers by Rhizome


Exhibit Hits Repeat

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Histories of new media often attribute its lineage to 'time-based media,' which is in turn a phrase generally used in reference to film, video, and photography. Time Frame, an exhibition at New York's P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, expands these genres and histories in its presentation of ten artists work. The show brings sculpture and installation art into conversation with film and video, and meditates on numerous temporal contexts, including duration, frequency, meter, rhythm, narrative, nostalgia, memory, and reflection. The artists--Cory Arcangel, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Nancy Holt, Roni Horn, Paul Pfeiffer, John Pilson, Thiago Rocha Pitta, Robert Smithson, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and Andy Warhol--also hail from different generations. The underlying comment made by this assemblage is one about history and perception. The work of older artists is recontextualized in light of younger artists' work, and many in the group deal with the historical reception and post-historical engagement with various cultural ephemera. It's all more approachable than this heady critique might imply, and locals can approach it through 18 September. - James Petrie

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Exhibit Hits Repeat

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Histories of new media often attribute its lineage to 'time-based media,' which is in turn a phrase generally used in reference to film, video, and photography. Time Frame, an exhibition at New York's P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, expands these genres and histories in its presentation of ten artists work. The show brings sculpture and installation art into conversation with film and video, and meditates on numerous temporal contexts, including duration, frequency, meter, rhythm, narrative, nostalgia, memory, and reflection. The artists--Cory Arcangel, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Nancy Holt, Roni Horn, Paul Pfeiffer, John Pilson, Thiago Rocha Pitta, Robert Smithson, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and Andy Warhol--also hail from different generations. The underlying comment made by this assemblage is one about history and perception. The work of older artists is recontextualized in light of younger artists' work, and many in the group deal with the historical reception and post-historical engagement with various cultural ephemera. It's all more approachable than this heady critique might imply, and locals can approach it through 18 September. - James Petrie

http://www.ps1.org/ps1_site/index.php?option=com_content&task;=view&id;=191&Itemid;=63

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


In Digital Age, Advancing a Flexible Copyright System

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An unusual alliance of artists, scientists and lawyers has been working to forge a "creative commons" that allows artists to decide which rights they want to retain and which they would rather share.

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Originally posted on NYT > Arts by Rhizome


Expanded Cinema

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expandedCinema

Expanded Cinema by Gene Youngblood is a classic in the field for its time. Published in 1970, it describes state-of-the-art cinema effects and techniques to speculate upon the incredible emerging possibilities in film, video art and cybernetic cinema. The book could be termed visionary, particularly in respect to what has happened to cinematic technology in recent years, also in its critique of the falling of commercial television and mainstream cinema. Mostly the book reveals how abstract cinema, without narrative, can take us to visual poetic spaces that anticipated laptop production, Vj'ng, Installation works and even generative art. Subchapter titles from the book reveal the terrain, Cathode Ray Videotronics, Computer Generated Holographic Movies, Teledynamic Environments, Synaesthetics and Kineasthetics: The way of experience.

The book examines the work of all the key filmmakers of the time, The Whitney Brothers, Stan Vanderbeek, John Stehura and Lillian Schwartz to name a few. The book even has a whole dedicated section to the extraordinary work of Jordan Belson, probably the only detailed commentary on Belson's work. Stills of these works are hard to find on the web so your be happy to know the book contains quite a few.

A PDF of the book can be found at two sources which is great as the out of print editions are very difficult to track down, at least without paying a price.

http://www.ubu.com/historical/youngblood/youngblood.html
http://www.vasulka.org/Kitchen/PDF_Expanded/Expanded.html

The latter is broken down into chapter PDFs. (Thanks the Peter for pointing me to this link).

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Originally posted on dataisnature.com by Rhizome


“The Networked City”, a presentation by Manuel Castells

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Some notes from "The Networked City: Information and communication technologies, spatial structure, and urban dynamics," a presentation by Manuel Castells at EPFL today. He addressed the transformation of urban/spatial forms due to IT and transportations systems. The presentations was in french, I took notes in english but it might be a bit rough.

manuel castells presentation

Networks are a fundamental transformation in the last 20 years, not due to technology, but intrinsically connected to it. If we say "network," we think globalization and no boundaries because they are organized around exchange that goes beyond institutions. These network have a specific dynamic: inclusion/exclusion.

Predictions done by "futurists" has proven to be wrong: the end of the city (due to IT transformations). We are seeing the most important urbanization phenomenon we have ever seen (50% of the earth population lives in cities today, 75% in 2050; Earth is not overpopulated, it's true for Belgium but not for Russia or Africa, 90% of california has village with less then 1000 inhabitants).

Analyzing the socio-spatial transformations due to IT, studies at his lab in UC Berkeley showed that there is no concentration and no decentralization: but there are both at the same time. This is a fundamental characteristics of networks: concentration and deconcentration. The point is to know what is concentrated and what is not (+ which sort of spatial constructions).
They found a huge processus of concentration in metropolitan regions (more than areas), and inside there is a big decentralization of fonctions with polycentric structures. See "The polycentric metropolis": constitution of macro-regions in europe (Tokyo-Nagoya, Paris-Lilles-Bruxelles, Ruhr, North of Italy, Lyon-Grenoble-Torino, Greater Shangai, San Paolo, Buenos Aires, LA).

Articulation/Interconnections of those regions thanks to transport and communication technologies. Those mega-metropolis are articulated in world networks: the Global City (Saskia Sassen). BUT this does ...

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Originally posted on pasta and vinegar by Rhizome