Posts for June 2006

Music Video Art on the Hudson River

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MUSIC VIDEO ART on the river & under the stars

Celebrate summer with EAI at a special open-air video screening on the Hudson River at Pier 63 Maritime.

Wednesday, June 28th 9:00 pm Pier 63 Maritime 23rd Street and the Hudson River (directions below) New York City Admission free

Please join EAI for an outdoor program of alternative music videos and music-based video by artists. The screening will include works by Cory Arcangel, Charles Atlas, Michael Bell-Smith, Johanna Billing, Dara Birnbaum, Meredith Danluck, Devin Flynn, Shana Moulton, Tony Oursler with Sonic Youth, Ara Peterson, Seth Price , and William Wegman.

The videos will be screened on the tented stage at Pier 63 Maritime, the public access pier on the Hudson River. Food and drinks will be available for purchase at the pier.

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The artist-made music videos in the program include Charles Atlas' new music video for Antony and the Johnsons, Ara Peterson's pulsing abstract video for Black Dice, Devin Fynn's animated epic for Erase Errata, William Wegman and Robert Breer's classic video for New Order's Blue Monday, and Tony Oursler and Sonic Youth's 1990 tribute to '70s pop star Karen Carpenter.

Other artists manipulate or re-conceive footage from appropriated music videos or live music performances. Cory Arcangel tries to take Simon out of Simon and Garfunkel's 1984 Central Park performance, while Michael Bell-Smith makes an entire R. Kelly DVD happen all at once. Dara Birnbaum integrates the audience and even the weather in her rendition of performances by Radio Fire Fight at the legendary Mudd Club and Glenn Branca.

Other works playfully subvert the music video format, reworking and reinterpreting its rules and strategies. Seth Price uses analogue video graphics to map out a pop history of the music genre ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Ceci


showtime: douglas gordon

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The link rolls to MOMA's page for Gordon's current show, of which here is the description: "In his most well-known works, Scottish artist Douglas Gordon (b. 1966) addresses the familiarity and popularity of moving pictures by manipulating, reframing, and superimposing them to alter viewers’ perceptions. His works provoke feelings of anxiety, recognition, and amnesia with respect to the circumstances of the reception of media today. This retrospective of Gordon’s work presents thirteen significant works by the artist, including 24 Hour Psycho (1993), Between Darkness and Light (After William Blake) (1997), and Play Dead; Real Time (2003). By forcing new encounters with the familiar and confrontations with the willfully forgotten, Gordon exposes the distance between our dimmed, distorted memories and, perhaps, the truth—emphatically demonstrating that what he sculpts is not only media but time itself." [....] ~mo

Originally posted on Happy Famous Artists by Rhizome


Installations at Eyebeam

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Modern Orthodox + EarthSpeaker

June 29 through July 15 Eyebeam is pleased to present three new installations developed in our studios exploring innovative uses of sound and light, both visible and undetectable, to fix and define spatial environments.

Elliott Malkin's Modern Orthodox is a working demonstration of a next-generation eruv installed on 21st Street in front of Eyebeam in New York City. An eruv (pronounced ey-roov [related]) is a symbolic boundary erected around religious Jewish communities throughout the world. While an eruv is typically constructed with poles and wires, Modern Orthodox employs a combination of low-power lasers, wifi surveillance cameras and graffiti, as a way of designating sacred volumes of space in urban areas.

The eruv is an ancient architectural construct that stems from the observation of the Sabbath, the sacred day of rest that includes a prohibition against certain kinds of work, including the carrying of objects outside of one's home, or private domain.

The presence of an eruv allows some carrying on the Sabbath by symbolically converting the shared public space within its boundaries into the shared private space of a community. In this way, observant Jews can carry objects such as keys or prayer books while acting in accordance with sacred Talmudic principles.

Because the physical integrity of an eruv is essential to its symbolic function, a breach in any portion of it renders it useless, which is why the entire circumference of an eruv, usually miles in length, is customarily inspected prior to every Sabbath. Malkin's laser eruv, however, which relies on a continuous stream of photons rather than cords and wires, is not as susceptible to permanent breakage. A branch of a tree, for example, may impede the flow of photons but will not permanently damage the eruv apparatus. In this way, the ...

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Surveillance light fixtures

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Mexican-born Rafael Lozano-Hemmer's Homographies combines twisted modernist aesthetics and surveillance technology.

The huge installation features 144 robotic fluorescent light fixtures controlled by 7 computerized surveillance systems. As people walk under the piece, the light tubes rotate to create labyrinthine patterns of light that are "paths" or "corridors" between them.

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The presence of a single person in the space is detected by the light fixtures as a magnetic frield of influence. When two or more people are detected, the system rotates the fixtures so that "light corridors" are created between them. As many people walk in the court, the light reflect the influence of all of them creating complex patterns similar to isobars.

Every few minutes, the system enters an "interlude mode" showing random orthogonal arrangements.

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Plasma screens on the gallery walls show the tracking systems with an overlay of data.

In Homographies the "vanishing point" is not architectural, but rather connective, i.e. it is determined by who is there at any given time and varies accordingly. This gives a reconfigurable light-space that is based on flow, on motion, on lines of sight -- an intended contrast to the modernist grid that currently organizes the court.

Video.

The installation was premiered at this year's Sydney Biennale, Zones of Contact, which runs until August 27.

See also another very similar work by Lozano-Hemmer: Standards and Double Standards (except that this time, belt buckles are following visitors) and Marie Sester's spotlight beam that tracks gallery visitors.

[...]

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Beijing Accelerator

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Marnix de Nijs is one of my favourite artists. His works are non-pretentious and understandable by anyone. Some of them seem to be inspired by playground attractions (run, motherfucker, run), others that explore our relationships with machines are uncannily compelling (Spatial Sounds or Push/Pull)

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Beijing Accelerator clearly belongs to the recreation ground. The inspiration for it came when the artist was visiting Beijing, and realized how quickly the dynamics of a city could transform into such apparent modernism. Similar to an earlier prototype, Panoramic Accelerator, it explores the effects of a tempo-driven society on the individual, this new version has an enhanced cinematographic experience as well as a superior interface.

The participant takes position in a racing-chair on a motorized structure equipped with a joystick. While the participant controls both the direction and speed of the chair, rotating panoramic images are projected on the 160x120 cm screen in front of him/her. The aim is to synchronize the moving image with the rotation of the chair in order to view the images properly and block the disorientation associated with the uncoordinated spinning. If the user cannot synchronize the speed of the chair with the images his balance system will send different information to the brain then the eyes do, causing an intense feeling of discontrol and can eventually lead to nausea.

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The target square in the top panoramic image needs to be matched with the same position shown on the magnified image below. As soon as this is achieved the images �¢ï¿½ï¿½snap into place�¢ï¿½ï¿½ and rotate in sync with the participants movement. After a short period of time however, a new rotating-panorama appears with a higher preset speed. This is determined as the next level (there are ...

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


C5@ZeroOne_San Jose: C5 Quest for Success

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Geri Wittig:

The C5 Quest for Success ­ Call for Participants Enter to play the C5 Quest for Success during the ZeroOne San Jose/ISEA 2006 Symposium August 9-12, 2006 http://www.c5corp.com

The C5 Quest for Success is an invited project for ZeroOne San Jose: A Global Festival of Art on the Edge. The ZeroOne San Jose Festival will transform San Jose into the North American epicenter of art and digital culture from August 7th to the 13th, showcasing the world's most innovative contemporary artists. http://01sj.org

Quest for Success is curatorial selection as urban game, testing competitors¹ analysis, management, and cooperative decision making skills - traits needed for success in Silicon Valley. The grand prize is a six to twelve week residency at the Montalvo Arts Center co-sponsored with C5 and a Silicon Valley corporate partner - a great opportunity for the right player with the right project pitch. Contestants navigate the streets of San Jose exploring GPS controlled narratives in an attempt to locate the C5 Corporate Limo. Once there, you just might have the opportunity to pitch your proposal to a panel of distinguished experts. A single winner from each evening's competition then advances to the final round on Saturday, August 12th. Three finalists representing TALK, DEMO, PERFORM 'present' their pitch live on-stage to an audience of thousands during the ZeroOne San Jose culminating celebration.

Does the smell of gasoline and oil perk you up like caffeine? Do lat and long coordinates make your heart sing? Then apply for a chance to win the Montalvo Arts Center ­ C5 artist residency. Six to twelve weeks in picturesque Saratoga, California, working on the project of your dreams with the assistance of one of Silicon Valley¹s corporate powerhouses. Does mapping make you giddy? Does your imagination swell ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Geri Wittig


sonambiente berlin 2006 - akademie der kunste, pariser platz

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As sonambiente berlin2006 is spread out throughout Berlin mitte, several large scale installations are located at both Akademie der Kunste in the old east and west of Berlin. Below are a selection of projects installed at Akademie der Kunste at Pariser Platz, on the old East side of Berlin. Their were several other projects, but I only documented the ones that I was intrigued by.

Near the entrance of Akademie der Kunste sits Jan-Peter E.R Sonntag "Modern Minimal Disco" where one stands on a round steel pedestal that feels as if it is hiding a giant subwoofer while bright lights shine on you as if you were the center piece of a photo shoot and if that isn't enough attention behind one is a wall sized mirror with the listener as the focal point. The audio presents a narrative that follows a progression that reaches nerve wrecking peak while the pedestal rumbles under one's feet, the lights shine and the listener begins to reach a club like ecstasy.



Jan-Peter E.R Sonntag "Modern Minimal Disco"

One room contains two works by Tilman Kuntzel - "Maintenance Measures for the SoundUnit Fan and Soundwall?" and "Sleep Capsule." The first presents a wall of shelves with the adidas footballs designed for the 2006 world cups all listening via headphones to the matches played. Each ball represents a country playing in the world cup and each ball listens to its country's games in its proper language. These audio broadcasts are being recorded and at the end of the World Cup Kuntzel will transform this recordings into an audio collage, I think largely composed of "GOAL" or "GOL" or "TOR"... and all the other forms of crying in happiness at one's nation's goal...



"Maintenance Measures for the SoundUnit Fan and ...

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Originally posted on Structural Patterns by Rhizome


Pigeon lights, Printball and a spinning computer

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Had a great time last week in Amsterdam (always have when i'm there). I spent some time in the basement of the Post CS building checking the 10.000 euros show, curated by Constant Dullaart, at the W139 gallery. Several very nice projects:

Harm van den Dorpels's Windows Washing machine was silently and efficiently doing its job. I also really liked Peter Vink's Traffic Collection video. The traffic which passed by in Arnhem is collected outside the videoframe and forms a spiral around the videoscreen. The videoscreen becomes smaller and smaller to make space for the increasing collection of cars.

Jasper van den Brink spent the winter of 2004 as an artist in residence in Stockholm. The light came only at 10 a.m. and disappeared at 2 p.m. That's how he got the idea of releasing over the city large flocks of pigeons with very small LED light attached to their legs so that people walking below could observe their light dance in the sky. Because homing pigeons always fly home straight away, the light can easily be removed after the flight.

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In both World Wars, pigeons were used for spying activities. Besides sending airmail, they could be equipped with small cameras for taking aerial photos (image of a pigeon camera).

Unfortunately the artist had to cancel the Pigeon Light project as it turned out that pigeons cannot easily find their way home in the dark because they navigate by the sun. Recnet research however indicate that pigeons have two additional navigation tools: a magnetic compass and a scent compass. But it's clear that navigation doesn't depend on any one system. In fact it is possible, albeit difficult, to train pigeons to become "night flying pigeons." Part of the training entails chasing ...

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Streets As Stages

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With networked technologies now a staple of urban life, it's hardly a surprise that new media artists so frequently engage the aesthetic possibilities of areas like street corners or shopping malls. The new exhibition, Urban Networks, organized by Susan Joyce at Boston's Art Interactive, presents works by John (Craig) Freeman, Jody Zellen, UrbanTells, Urban Atmospheres, and Finishing School, all of whom explore technologically-mediated encounters and situations in city spaces. Some are interested in social behavior such as 'Meet/Greet,' by Finishing School, which examines the interactions between a customized polylingual drone and the pedestrians it addresses. Others are research-based, such as 'Imaging Place,' initiated by Freeman in 1997, which considers possibilities for location-based virtual reality experiences. On Thursday, June 29th, Art Interactive will team up with new media art organization Turbulence and the Boston branch of the international artist-run Upgrade! to present two artists' talks in conjunction with the exhibition. Join Vancouver-based Nancy Nisbet and MIT graduate student Amber Frid-Jimenez as they discuss their practices--and stretch your notion of creative terrain from your studio out onto the street. - Lauren Cornell

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Streets As Stages

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With networked technologies now a staple of urban life, it's hardly a surprise that new media artists so frequently engage the aesthetic possibilities of areas like street corners or shopping malls. The new exhibition, Urban Networks, organized by Susan Joyce at Boston's Art Interactive, presents works by John (Craig) Freeman, Jody Zellen, UrbanTells, Urban Atmospheres, and Finishing School, all of whom explore technologically-mediated encounters and situations in city spaces. Some are interested in social behavior such as 'Meet/Greet,' by Finishing School, which examines the interactions between a customized polylingual drone and the pedestrians it addresses. Others are research-based, such as 'Imaging Place,' initiated by Freeman in 1997, which considers possibilities for location-based virtual reality experiences. On Thursday, June 29th, Art Interactive will team up with new media art organization Turbulence and the Boston branch of the international artist-run Upgrade! to present two artists' talks in conjunction with the exhibition. Join Vancouver-based Nancy Nisbet and MIT graduate student Amber Frid-Jimenez as they discuss their practices--and stretch your notion of creative terrain from your studio out onto the street. - Lauren Cornell

http://www.artinteractive.org/shows/urban_networks/

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome