Posts for July 2006

showtime: saskia olde wolbers

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Originally posted on Happy Famous Artists by Rhizome


Turbulence Commission: "My Beating Blog" by Yury Gitman

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Turbulence.org:

July 3, 2006 Turbulence Commission: "My Beating Blog" by Yury Gitman with technical assistance from Benjamin Bacon http://turbulence.org/works/beatingheart/blog/

"My Beating Blog" is an attempt to take the journaling aspect of blogging into a surrealistic future in which the author literally and metaphorically bares his heart. For three weeks, a series of posts contextualizing heart-rate visualizations, GPS-maps, and personal journal entries will give online users a rare entrance into personal medical-grade statistics, stalker-level location tracking, and the private thoughts of the blogger. Inevitably, issues regarding privacy, exhibitionism, and voyeurism playfully emerge as the blogosphere is infused with biofeedback and location technology. Rather than play into a dystopian or Orwellian future, blogs and biofeedback are given poetic license, reframing our awareness of our own and each others' beating hearts.

"My Beating Blog" is a 2005 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence web site. It is supported by the Jerome Foundation in celebration of the Jerome Hill Centennial and in recognition of the valuable contributions of artists to society.

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Turbulence.org


Silent London

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london
Simon Elvins has some nice work but one recent cartographic exercise stands out as a cross between the 1748 Map of Rome by Giambattista Nolli and Learning from Las Vegas by Robert Venturi, Steven Izenour & Denise Scott Brown in 1977. The Silent London etching maps noise levels throughout London in an attempt to reveal the quiet and hidden pockets of the city so as to make them a destination, possibly diffusing the noise concentrations in other areas.

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Originally posted on Ohmpage by Rajio


Rush Creek Wilderness Trail Phase 2 *Now Open*

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C5 Landscape Database API 2.0 image
Paula Poole:

The Rush Creek Wilderness Trail is possibly the world's first computationally derived, unofficial public wilderness trail. The trail was first "discovered" by a computer algorithm called a "virtual hiker" (a feature of the C5 Landscape Database API) that traversed the backcountry of California. The results produced a tracklog that can be uploaded to a GPS device and then followed by a real hiker through the actual landscape. Phase 1 of the trail (From the Rush Creek Wilderness Trailhead to Rush Creek Spring) was opened by Brett Stalbaum December 27th and 28th of 2005. Phase 2 of the trail (Rush Creek Spring to the De Facto Rush Creek Trail Terminus) was opened by Stalbaum and Paula Poole June 19th-21st of 2006.

The trail provides beautiful views of the Great Basin desert environment, plentiful wildlife viewing opportunities, solitude, and the unique experience of comparing the wayfinding abilities of a computer algorithm to your own wayfinding skills and intuition. For safety, backcountry experience is required.

Info:
http://www.paintersflat.net/rush_creek/

GPS Data:
http://www.paintersflat.net/rush_creek/data.html

Video:
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=6420463550697768755

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Paula Poole


Cast-offs from the Golden Age

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header graphic

"Cast-offs from the Golden Age" invites the user to adopt the position of the researcher, unearthing the specific local histories of digital games and gaming, in New Zealand. The user lays down Avenues of Inquiry, whereupon Events -- representing stages in the research -- occur, gaining the user knowledge for their research journal, additions to their ephemera gallery, and unlocking further goals, avenues and events. The piece uses audio, text, and visuals from the research, including historic items sourced from ephemera collections.

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Museolab: museolab technology testing

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Lyon’s future museum called "Muse des Confluences" (architecture by Coop Himmelblau) has a research structure called Museolab that aims at inventing, experimenting and validating technologies and services that would improve museum visitors' experience (better interacting and understanding an exhibit). Museolab will then test the technologies that will then be validated at the Museum.

What they are working on is pretty close to nowadays trends: personalization according to a certain visitor's profile, learning devices based on the visitors' paths and actions, use of RFID tags...

One of the intriguing project they have is called "La Malle A  Objets" using smaller versions of object exhibited in the museum, people can drop it close to a device that would give them information about it. I am definitely not an expert of museum technologies but it's interesting to see how tangible interfaces also pervades in this kind of settings.

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Originally posted on pasta and vinegar by Rhizome


Melbourne Digital Fringe Festival CFS

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This looks like a good opportunity to get your machinima up onto some big screens in a very public part of downtown Melbourne, Australia (and elsewhere). They'e also interested in exhibiting mobile SMS to screen interfaces..

From the call for submissions:

Digital Fringe is seeking submissions of digital visual material to be a part of the Melbourne Fringe Festival: September 27 to October 15.

http://digitalfringe.com.au for more info.

Digital Fringe connects to Melbourne via numerous screens throughout the city. These range from the grand screen at Federation Square to screens hidden in venues and retail outlets, from screens in public spaces, taxis and mobile 3G handsets to bedrooms at home and projections on buildings.

Digital Fringe artworks will be streamed live to all participating screens and made available for live streaming over the Internet from the Digital Fringe website.

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Originally posted on selectparks by Rhizome


online art video work by major contemporary artists

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Originally posted on Happy Famous Artists by Rhizome


Tracking the Torture Taxis

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In late 2004, reports began to surface of CIA operatives using modified commercial aircraft for extraordinary rendition, the practice of illegally kidnapping suspected terrorists and flying them to secret bases in foreign countries for torture and interrogation.

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To heighten public awareness and to facilitate public participation in monitoring this illicit practice, Trevor Paglen and the Institute for Applied Autonomy propose Terminal Air, a dynamic information artwork that aggregates and visualizes torture taxi data.

Combining data supplied by the Federal Aviation Administration with information harvested from the network of "planespotters" --who collect photos, flight plans, and other aircraft ephemera to track CIA torture planes, Terminal Air will enable users to track CIA-operated flights between commercial airports and military bases around the world; and to trace the history of individual aircraft through the shadow networks of front companies and nonexistent individuals that the government uses to obscure the planes' identities and purposes. Visitors to the project website will see a regularly updated map showing the arrivals and departures of known torture taxis, their destinations and information about the front company operating them. Registered users will be able to be notified via SMS when a CIA torture plan is arriving at an airport near them and will be encouraged to post photographs of the planes to the site. In addition, a large-scale, multi-display installation will be developed to bring the project to audiences at various venues.

The work is another awarded commissions by Rhizome to assist artists in creating original works of Internet-based art.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


sonambiente berlin 2006 - old Polish Embassy

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The group of projects featured at the old Polish Emabssy on Unter den Liden, I believe comprises the strongest set of works of sonambiente. [....]

In a small dark room, lit only by small green LEDs that spotlight several digital screens mounted on the walls, Nic Collins has brought wreckage upon several cheap, noisy, hand held electronic games, the sort that are abundant in China Town. Collins tears away the plastic housing, manipulates the electronics, cables the screens so that they may be featured on the walls at an angle. The dancing cubes of the screens are lit by small LEDs that create a shadow play behind the screen. These screens are only connected to their brains by alligator clamps. Heaped in one corner of the room are all the electronics, the plastic housing and a blurbing speaker. Cheap, low-tech and messy, Collins transforms these repetitive, uninteresting, time-killing gadgets into an alluring installation - "no part of an eviscerated toy goes to waste."


Nicolas Collins, Daguerreotypes 2006

Achim Wollscheid has animated the second story windows facing the tourist filled Unter din Liden as they open and close according to the movement of the viewers in the second story corridor. " A program traslates the data gained by motion tracking into a correlative action of the mororized window openers."

Achim Wollscheid, inlet outlet 2006

Both the larger GP4 (Global Player 04) and it's much smaller sibling GPod are on display transmitting the sounds of the Earth. Jens Brand has made audible the real-time data of over 1500 satellites so that you may listen to the Earth in the comfort of your home or now with GPod while you are on your way to work or jogging. The GPod displays 3D model of the Earth, along with the coordinates tracked by the satellite that ...

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Please click-through for a longer post describing more projects...

Originally posted on Structural Patterns by Rhizome