Posts for July 2006

DataVapour 04-07-06

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pixelform
Pixel Maelstrom - Philip Stearns

Busy, Busy...

The TI99 is a "vintage" home computer system from 1981 made by Texas Instruments. Philip Stearns has been bending its circuits to make a real-time audio responsive glitch machine - the Pixel Maelstrom. Maybe you want to try? Check out this page for advice on how to start circuit bending with toy musical instruments using bluetack!

Over at the always inspiring Bldgblog we hear of the Earth-Surface-Machine, 'an interactive geotextile that could be used for reinforcing landscapes and buildings of the future'.

Obselete presents 120 years of Electronic Musical Instruments. Who wouln't enjoy curiosities such as the Optophonic Piano ? - a device that generated sounds and projected revolving patterns onto a wall by directing a bright light through a series revolving painted glass, filters, mirrors and lenses.

Marius leads us to the work of Simon Elvins and his exploration into sound, print and notation. Then rebounds with a link to some exquisite musical notation presented at Biblioodyssey. Dataisnature has touched on this theme before in a little less detail.

Sanch, the chief experimenter at Meso now has a blog documenting the fantastic forms he creates using VVVV! (see previous posts on the Superformula).

Splitscreen is a blog dedicated to split, composite and multi-screen visuals.

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Originally posted on dataisnature.com by Rhizome


Many Festivals In One

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If you're still undecided about your summer vacation plans, you might think about visiting sunny California, next month. The city of San Jose will be overflowing with creativity and innovation from August 7-13, during the biennial ISEA symposium. The international group known as the Inter-Society for Electronic Arts (ISEA) picks different host cities to present the event, every two years, and this year belongs to the Silicon Valley. ISEA2006 will also coincide with the inauguration of the biennial ZeroOne San Jose festival, subtitled 'A Global Festival of Art on the Edge.' Jointly, they will present art exhibitions, performances, and events by leading and emerging new media artists from the local community and around the world. As is tradition, the ISEA symposium will also consist of academic talks by leaders in the field, centered mostly on the themes of Transvergence, Interactive Cities, Community Domains, and the Pacific Rim -- the latter of which is also the theme of a major summit preceding the festival. Speakers' papers will be posted online prior to the conference, to eliminate the need for stodgy paper-reading and to encourage pre-loaded engagement. Book your tickets now and be prepared for a city as wild as it is warm. - Angela Moreno

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Digital Remains

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In the past people would store the letters they sent each other in a box and they would order the family pictures in a photo album. After their death, their children would keep and browse through those remains to remember the moments with the deceased person. Today most of us don't write letters anymore but exchange emails. What happens to the emails and other digital data when we die?

1dfitg.jpg 2digitl.jpg

Michele Gauler's graduation project at Interaction Design RCA is concerned with the role data plays when we remember deceased people. Digital Remains assumes a world in which our data is stored on the network creating digital archives of generations of people.

Personal access keys are used to log on to the digital remains of a person and receive their data on our own digital devices. These keys, when placed next to a mobile phone, MP3 player or computer, establish a bluetooth connection with the device and trigger a remote log-on to the digital remains of the deceased person they are linked to, allowing a person to access the dead person's data. Based on data tags and meta data, search algorithms dig through a deceased person's data, presenting the content that is most likely relevant to us. For instance, a photograph from a holiday we spent with the person 10 years ago, or the person's favourite piece of music which they typically listened to while writing e-mails. The system may bring up emails the deceased read and re-read or it might suggest their own particular way of moving around the keyboard, of naming files and structuring folders. Someone who's not a close relative, for example, would get only a partial access to the deceased's data and anything you don't want others to know of ...

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Many Festivals In One

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If you're still undecided about your summer vacation plans, you might think about visiting sunny California, next month. The city of San Jose will be overflowing with creativity and innovation from August 7-13, during the biennial ISEA symposium. The international group known as the Inter-Society for Electronic Arts (ISEA) picks different host cities to present the event, every two years, and this year belongs to the Silicon Valley. ISEA2006 will also coincide with the inauguration of the biennial ZeroOne San Jose festival, subtitled 'A Global Festival of Art on the Edge.' Jointly, they will present art exhibitions, performances, and events by leading and emerging new media artists from the local community and around the world. As is tradition, the ISEA symposium will also consist of academic talks by leaders in the field, centered mostly on the themes of Transvergence, Interactive Cities, Community Domains, and the Pacific Rim -- the latter of which is also the theme of a major summit preceding the festival. Speakers' papers will be posted online prior to the conference, to eliminate the need for stodgy paper-reading and to encourage pre-loaded engagement. Book your tickets now and be prepared for a city as wild as it is warm. - Angela Moreno

http://01sj.org/

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


audio artists/musicians call for work - vague terrain 04: the body digital

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Greg Smith:

call for audio artists/musicians - vague terrain 04: the body digital

Context:

In his 1964 text "Understanding Media" media theorist & future-caster Marshall McLuhan stated that electricity was an extension of the nervous system. The next issue of Vague Terrain is dedicated to continuing this line of thought and exploring both the interface and friction between contemporary digital technology and the body. Vague Terrain 04: the body digital will serve as a catalog of new conceptions of the intersection between the physical and digital realms, one in which the body is read as a dataset, instrument, and host to new economies and discourses.

The Call:

Vagueterrain.net's fourth issue will be entitled "the body digital" and we are currently seeking the work of audio artists and musicians whose work deals with the interface between the body and contemporary technology to showcase in this issue. Vague Terrain 04: the body digital will be published online in early September 2006 so work would need to be submitted by mid August. Vague Terrain audio submissions generally consist of 30-40 minutes of original sound/music which is distributed through our publication via an author sanctioned creative commons license.

Please see http://www.vagueterrain.net for more information about the scope of our publication.

If you are interested in contacting us regarding submitting audio work to this issue, or have any questions please contact us via submit@vagueterrain.net

Thanks for your time!

Greg Smith & Neil Wiernik editors/curators http://www.vagueterrain.net

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Greg Smith


Livecoding

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Kinetics of Performance

Watching programmers write code can be about as fun as watching paint dry, but a few pioneers are creating dynamic, musical performances based on programming languages such as Perl. Here are photos of a few of these artists at work. Check out our other photo galleries on our photo blog.

University of California, San Diego, art professor Amy Alexander performs sets using her own language, Thingee. Alexander says electronic music lacks the kinetic aspects of performance -- seeing a performer do something that has an audible reaction, so she shows crowds her code and enters script commands with guitar-like flourishes. Photo: Courtesy of Amy Alexander [via Wired's Livecoding blog]

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


BibliOdyssey: More musical notation

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Bibliodyssey: Musical notation

From BibliOdyssey: George Crumb: Makrokosmos I / Barry Guy: Bird Gong Game

BibliOdyssey

Today’s post on the visual context of music is of potential interest to Generator.x readers. It deals with unconventional visual forms of musical notation, from the illustrative to the conqrete, from the ancient to contemporary. It should prove intriguing and well worth the time to indulge in both the images and links provided.

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beating heart data blog

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a web blog in which the author literally & metaphorically bares his heart. the artist-blogger wears a GPS-enabled Heart-rate monitor throughout parts of the day, then blogs the data along with matching personal experiences, events, & musings. for 3 weeks, the site will blog a series of posts contextualizing heart-rate visualizations, GPS-maps, & personal journal entries. online users are given a rare entrance into personal medical-grade statistics, location tracking, & the private thoughts of the blogger.
[turbulence.org]

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Originally posted on information aesthetics by infosthetics


ISEA re:mote CFP

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ISEA (International Symposium on Electronic Art)2006, an international conference held in conjunction with ZeroOne San Jose: A Global Festival of art on the Edge, will be held in San Jose, CA, August 7-13 2006. Both events are "situated at the critical intersection of art and technology." ISEA2006 re:mote is a symposium within ISEA2006 and is issuing a Call for Proposals.


ISEA2006 re:mote, August 10-12, 2006

International new media art discourse is stimulated by festivals and events like ISEA2006 which form temporary cultural centers to represent, present and discuss networked and digital technologies. However by forming temporary centers we also tacitly create a notion of a periphery - with temporary centers also come temporary peripheries. In new media culture this is a paradox as much new media art, theory, and discourse reflects on the network itself and the elusiveness and redundancy of centers and peripheries.

ISEA2006 re:mote attempts to dissuade us from imposing these distinctions by providing a platform for artists, commentators, curators, performers and theorists to participate in ISEA 2006 via online and pre-recorded media.

ISEA2006 re:mote Open Call

ISEA2006 re:mote is inviting media spaces and individual artists, theorists, and curators from around the world to speak or perform via remote technologies to the audience at ISEA. Presentations to be directed at the four themes of ISEA 2006. Participants are invited to present or perform on topics included within the ISEA symposium, and onsite audience interaction with the presenters is also encouraged. ISEA re:mote will focus on presenting media spaces and people that would otherwise be excluded from presenting their work at ISEA due to financial, political, or logistical reasons. [More....]

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Helen Varley Jamieson


Comedies of Fair U$e: fulll audio now on Archive.org

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The entire Comedies conference (audio) is now available at Archive.org for listening and for free download, thanks to Fred Benenson who had the time and energy, not to mention the know-how, to clean-up all of these mp3s and get them up online. Note: they are licensed with a Creative Commons deed: Attribution-ShareAlike

Other material such as: NPR pre-conference coverage with Siva Vaidhyanathan, Art Spiegelman + Jonathan Lethem; On The Media interviews with James Boyle and Amy Sewel; links to imagery, transcripts and blog commentary, etc., are available at the COMEDIES OF FAIR U$E blog: http://newsgrist.typepad.com/comediesoffairuse/

here is the link to
Archive.org: 

Comediesarchive

Full Program:
The New York Institute for the Humanities at NYU, in association with the NYU Humanities Council presented a weekend long symposium

COMEDIES OF FAIR U$E
A Search for Comity in the Intellectual Property Wars

Friday, April 28 through Sunday, April 30, 2006
Free and open to the public

Friday April 28, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Saturday 9:30-6:30 p.m. and Sunday 9:30-1:00 p.m.
Hemmerdinger Hall
100 Washington Sq. East

FRIDAY, APRIL 28
7:30pm-7:45pm Introductory remarks : Robert Boynton
7:45pm-9:30pm Lawrence Lessig on The Current State of Fair Use with responses by Allan Adler and Hugh Hansen
Siva Vaidhyanathan (moderator)

SATURDAY, APRIL 29
9:30am -10:00am Introductory remarks: Lawrence Weschler
(Note: Lawrence Lessig and Judge Kozinski will comment as the day progresses)

10:00am-11:30am Art
Joy Garnett, Susan Mieselas, Lebbeus Woods,
Art Spiegelman, Carrie McLaren, Joel Wachs
Lawrence Weschler (moderator)

11:45am-1:15pm The Permissions Maze
Geoff Dyer, Susan Bielstein, Allan Adler
James Boyle (moderator)

Break

2:30pm-3:15pm Screening of short films: films from the 826 NYC kids
and the Free Culture remix contest. Comments on the
issues they ...

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Originally posted on NEWSgrist by joy garnett