Posts for July 2006

[Hans W. Koch]

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[...] computers as musical instruments I-III by Hans W. Koch.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


[Spatial Sounds]

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100dB at 100km/h: Spatial Sounds by Edwin van der Heide and Marnix de Nijs.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


Outsider Space Art

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San Francisco-based artist Jonathon Keats often becomes so fluent in scientific systems that he pushes extreme rationality into the zone of absurdity. Such was the case when he worked with UC Berkeley engineers in an attempt to 'genetically engineer God, in a petrie dish,' or when he went to elaborate lengths to 'personalize' the metric system for individual observers. Now he claims to have 'discovered that a radio signal detected by the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico contains artwork broadcast from deep space.' The narrative spun in promotional materials for the project asserts that the signal 'originated between the constellations Aries and Pisces thousands of years ago,' and is the 'most significant addition to the artistic canon since the Mona Lisa, or even the Venus of Willendorf.' Keats has translated this newly-received signal into a painting, which goes on view at Berkeley's Magnes Museum later this month, but the work extends to the mass-mediated communication that surrounds this 'discovery.' His larger project deals with the culture of investigation, the sibling sciences of transmission and decryption, and a meditation of what data gets discarded, valorized, or reified in our culture. - Irene Wu

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Outsider Space Art

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San Francisco-based artist Jonathon Keats often becomes so fluent in scientific systems that he pushes extreme rationality into the zone of absurdity. Such was the case when he worked with UC Berkeley engineers in an attempt to 'genetically engineer God, in a petrie dish,' or when he went to elaborate lengths to 'personalize' the metric system for individual observers. Now he claims to have 'discovered that a radio signal detected by the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico contains artwork broadcast from deep space.' The narrative spun in promotional materials for the project asserts that the signal 'originated between the constellations Aries and Pisces thousands of years ago,' and is the 'most significant addition to the artistic canon since the Mona Lisa, or even the Venus of Willendorf.' Keats has translated this newly-received signal into a painting, which goes on view at Berkeley's Magnes Museum later this month, but the work extends to the mass-mediated communication that surrounds this 'discovery.' His larger project deals with the culture of investigation, the sibling sciences of transmission and decryption, and a meditation of what data gets discarded, valorized, or reified in our culture. - Irene Wu

http://www.magnes.org/exhibits/coming.html

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


A review of “where the action is?” (Paul Dourish)

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Dourish, P, (2001)
“Where the Action Is : The Foundations of Embodied Interaction”, MIT Press: Cambridge.

The book is about the common thread between current developments in Human-Computer Interaction and Computer-Supported Collaborative Work: embodiment, which is a central underlying concept for tangible computing and social computing. Tangible computing refers to the distribution of computation across different devices in the physical environment, and are sensitive to their location and proximity to other devices and people. Social computing refers to the increasing attempt of understanding the social world for interactive system design. Both have in common the familiarity with the everyday world and the way we experience it, the facts that things are embedded in the world (which is physical but also a social context).

[More....]

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Originally posted on pasta and vinegar by Rhizome


ISEA06 Sampler

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Next month's ISEA will be showcasing quite an array of electronic artwork. While San Jose ain't quite the Baltic Sea (gang + 1 2 3 4 5 6 7), it’s much easier for North Americans like us to get to. Scanning the list, here's a few previews that stood out to me, that may be of particular interest to GTxA readers. Text and images excerpted from the site.


Wildlife
, Karolina Sobecka
At nighttime projections from moving cars are shone on the buildings in the industrial/abandoned part of town. Each car projects a video of a wild animal. The animal's movements are programmed to correspond to the speed of the car: as the car moves, the animal runs along it, as the car stops, the animal stops also. Aggressive driving is reflected in the aggressive behavior of the animal. The animals are avatars of the drivers, who, enclosed in their bubble of safety, are separated from the stark and dangerous world of urban reality, as being in a different universe. Several vehicles can be taking part in the performance, creating interactions between the various animals, as the vehicles pass or get closer and further away from each other.

Amy and Klara (also see full project page), Marc Bahlen
Amy and Klara are robot characters capable of synthetic text to speech generation and automated speech recognition, for which the charged world of foul language is under investigation. Swearing offers several interesting conduits into a critique of the under-exposed normative tendencies in automated language representation and social robotics. Why are most smart gadgets and toys friendly and playful, why are they usually modelled as pets or servants? Machines that curse and pick a fight might offer a more realistic preparation for a shared future between machines and humans ...

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Originally posted on Grand Text Auto by andrew


[Joseph Beuys]

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Sonne statt Reagan by Joseph Beuys.

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Posting some classics, today. This one has made the rounds before, but just in case you've not seen it...

Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


Congratulations ABC No Rio!

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ABC No Rio buys its building!

The New York Times, July 4, 2006
For $1, a Collective Mixing Art and Radical Politics Turns Itself Into Its Own Landlord
By Colin Moynihan

[...] Standing on the north side of Rivington, between Suffolk and Clinton Streets, is one of the few buildings that have barely changed in two decades: a crumbling, four-story structure that at one time was inhabited by squatters and now houses ABC No Rio, a community and cultural center that seeks to explore the interaction of art and radical politics. [...] The transaction came after years of negotiations, and one of the conditions was that the nonprofit collective that runs the building had to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars to begin renovations. [...] "ABC No Rio exists as a resource for people with a diverse set of politics and a very broad sense of what is art," Eric Goldhagen, a collective member, said. "They can exchange ideas in a nondogmatic atmosphere out of which dynamic and interesting projects tend to grow." [...] A sign near the front door of the pale brick building bears the motto "Culture of opposition since 1980." [Click-through for the full article...]

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Originally posted on Temporary Services by Rhizome


Mario Soup by Ben Fry

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Mario Soup is an information visualization project by Ben Fry that aims at "revealing a beautiful soup of the thousands of individual elements that make up the game screen. It used "the unpacking of a Nintendo game cartridge, decoding the program as a four-color image, revealing a beautiful soup of the thousands of individual elements that make up the game screen"

Any piece of executable code is also commingled with data, ranging from simple sentences of text for error messages to entire sets of graphics for the application. In older cartridge-based console games, the images for each of the small on-screen images (the "sprites") were often stored as raw data embedded after the actual program's instructions.
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The images are a long series of 8x8 pixel "tiles". Looking at the cartridge memory directly (with a black pixel for an "on" bit, and a white pixel for an "off") reveals the sequence of black and white (one bit) 8x8 images. Each pair of images is mixed together to produce a two bit (four-color) image. The blue represents the first sequence of image data, the red layer is the second set of data that is read, and seeing them together produces the proper mixed-color image depicting the actual image data

Why do I blog this? I like this idea of "soup" and intertwined individual elements that eventually constitute a game screen: destructuring the game display.

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Originally posted on pasta and vinegar by Rhizome


Slavery's Ephemera

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Slavery's Ephemera
By Judith Jackson Fossett
Design by Erik Loyer

From Editors' Introduction

Nearly 150 years after the height of the plantation South, the presumed �romance� of the era still seems to hold sway in the American national imaginary. Tourism at plantation sites has surged in recent years. The visitor to these locales surveys a very particular past, for tour guides typically focus on architectural spectacle and period furnishings as they sketch a specific (and usually white-washed) history of ephemeral southern grandeur. The visiting tourist is powerfully positioned within a mise-en-scene of imagined hospitality, an immersive experience underwritten both by the mansions� scale and lush settings and by the simultaneous erasure of virtually all traces of slavery. The visitor is swept into a stage set ripe for fantasy, creating a powerful scene for the projection of romance and structuring a sort of mobility through an imagined space of history. This fantasy unfolds in an isolated temporal and geographic zone, narrativized as separate in space and time, a lost moment reflecting a �gentler� past that mustn�t be disturbed by the ghostly presence of the slave. These tours serve to freeze the possible meanings of the South, the plantation, and the past along very narrow registers.

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Originally posted on Critical Spatial Practice by Rhizome