Posts for July 2006

showtime: elmgreen & dragset

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click here and here and here
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Originally posted on Happy Famous Artists by Rhizome


Looking forward, Looking back

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Harkness A/V is an ongoing collaborative Audio/Visual salon organized by Nick Hallett and Monkeytown, an art space and restaurant in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. On Friday July 21st, they will present an evening of works by renowned computer artist Lillian Schwartz and up-and-coming San Francisco-based video artist, Nate Boyce. Schwartz pioneered the field of computer-generated art beginning in the late 1960s, and her experimentations have served to legitimate the practice. While Schwartz utilized nascent computer technologies to establish a canonical aesthetic for the field, Boyce uses newish computer programs, such as Jitter and Maya, to recall the style of early video art. Side by side, the combination of these artists offers an interesting contrast between two generations of computer-produced art, between an era in which the present once aimed to foretell the future, and the future now aims to evoke the past. - Ceci Moss

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Looking forward, Looking back

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Harkness A/V is an ongoing collaborative Audio/Visual salon organized by Nick Hallett and Monkeytown, an art space and restaurant in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. On Friday July 21st, they will present an evening of works by renowned computer artist Lillian Schwartz and up-and-coming San Francisco-based video artist, Nate Boyce. Schwartz pioneered the field of computer-generated art beginning in the late 1960s, and her experimentations have served to legitimate the practice. While Schwartz utilized nascent computer technologies to establish a canonical aesthetic for the field, Boyce uses newish computer programs, such as Jitter and Maya, to recall the style of early video art. Side by side, the combination of these artists offers an interesting contrast between two generations of computer-produced art, between an era in which the present once aimed to foretell the future, and the future now aims to evoke the past. - Ceci Moss

http://www.monkeytownhq.com/schwartzboyce.html

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


[Julianne Swartz]

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Two pop songs, How deep is your Love by the Bee Gees and Love by John Lennon, are acoustically transmitted through 400 feet of tubing through the museum. The songs emanate from the basement/s defunct boiler unit into a tubing system which follow the existing water and electrical pipes, winding through the hallways and stairwells of the building. The songs eventually emit from a funnel which hangs in the gallery space two floors above, leaking sound at points along the route.

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"Can You Hear Me?" is a functional alternative telephone. It uses PVC pipe and mirrors to make an aural and visual communication link from the second floor lobby of the Sunshine Hotel, to the street below. Passers-by on the street can call up through the tube and be heard in the Sunshine's communal lobby area. Both projects by Julianne Swartz.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


Content-less places in virtual and physical realms

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Via aeiou, Internet Soul Portraits is a project by Mark Callahan:

Internet Soul Portraits (I.S.P.), net art project

I.S.P. is a tongue-in-cheek treatment of web design as pure representation. In this project, familiar images are altered by the application of essentialist, reductive approaches from a painterly tradition. The images are derived from the home pages of some of the most popular sites on the Web: Yahoo, Google, MSN, Amazon, CNN, eBay, The Weather Channel, MapQuest, Best Buy, and MySpace.

Removing the content of this virtual place, it reminds me some art projects such as “Floating Logos” by Matt Siber (on the left) or Christoph Steinbrener et Rainer Dempf’s “Delete!” project or Cedric Bernadotte’s “A town without writings” (below):


Why do I blog this? I like the parallel between virtual and real place.

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Originally posted on pasta and vinegar by Rhizome


LOOKING FOR LIMINALITY IN ARCHITECTURAL SPACE

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Transitional Space/The Third Space

"In this paper, I would like to connect architectural praxis with theories and practices of liminality. Liminality is a cultural and philosophical concept often used in contemporary discourse on art and spatial experience. Authors like Jonathan Hill and Gianni Vattimo also connect liminality and marginality in contemporary art practice to architecture. These authors define liminality as the conceptual, ephemeral relationships between people and spatial environments. Traditional, professional architectural practice is orientated around building procurement and objects rather than human experience, so that building users and architects who change, appropriate and subvert building agendas act as an illegal, politicised architect. Both Hill and Mitchell believe architects could supplant concerns for building objects with user experience by drawing from contemporary art practices that give priority to audience experience. The diverse practices of installation art make audience experience a central concern of the artwork.

Nevertheless, there is minimal recognition of philosophies of liminality within architectural discourse. Furthermore, and most importantly, there is little indication of how liminality may be put into practice. In this paper, I would like to begin to explore a praxis of liminality by connecting philosophies of liminality to theories and practices within contemporary of architecture and art. Praxis, here, refers to the theory-practice nexus. I would like to raise many of the difficulties associated with theories of liminality and conventional, modern architecture and art practices, as highlighted in my own, and other peoples. experiences. My aim is therefore to explore other ways of seeing architecture using the concept of liminality rather than proposing finite conclusions." From LOOKING FOR LIMINALITY IN ARCHITECTURAL SPACE by Catherine Smith.

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


New Media Poetics: Contexts, Technotexts and Theories (MIT Press)

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Brian Kim Stefans:

New Media Poetics
Contexts, Technotexts, and Theories
Edited by Adalaide Morris and Thomas Swiss

http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/?ttype=2&tid=10918

New media poetry--poetry composed, disseminated, and read on computers--exists in various configurations, from electronic documents that can be navigated and/or rearranged by their "users" to kinetic, visual, and sound materials through online journals and archives like UbuWeb, PennSound, and the Electronic Poetry Center. Unlike mainstream print poetry, which assumes a bounded, coherent, and self-conscious speaker, new media poetry assumes a synergy between human beings and intelligent machines. The essays and artist statements in this volume explore this synergy's continuities and breaks with past poetic practices, and its profound implications for the future.

By adding new media poetry to the study of hypertext narrative, interactive fiction, computer games, and other digital art forms, New Media Poetics extends our understanding of the computer as an expressive medium, showcases works that are visually arresting, aurally charged, and dynamic, and traces the lineage of new media poetry through print and sound poetics, procedural writing, gestural abstraction and conceptual art, and activist communities formed by emergent poetics.

Contributors:
Giselle Beiguelman, John Cayley, Alan Filreis, Loss Pequeño Glazier, Alan Golding, Kenneth Goldsmith, N. Katherine Hayles, Cynthia Lawson, Jennifer Ley, Talan Memmott, Adalaide Morris, Carrie Noland, Marjorie Perloff, William Poundstone, Martin Spinelli, Stephanie Strickland, Brian Kim Stefans, Barrett Watten, Darren Wershler-Henry

[More...]

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Brian Kim Stefans


Fly with your arms

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As a young child I remember playing superhero, running around with my arms extended, or flying like a plane with my arms to the side (well maybe not). Interaction designers can learn alot from child's play, so its interesting to see a few projects using the arms extended technique.

Cloud

The appropriately titled I Am More Than My Thumb is the thesis project of Kellee Santiago (founder of thatgamecompany), is a body-based interface experiment seeking to engage the entire body, using the game Cloud. For anyone not aware of the Cloud game, it was developed by university students in the Interactive Media Division at USC, and you should really have a play.

This project allows you to control the character using your body. Tilt your arms to turn and raise them to go faster or lower to slow down. It uses the PhaseSpace motion capture set-up, essentially cameras tracking LEDs on the wearers body. It's great that the player in the photos is wearing a pijama outfit (like the boy in the game) and I think this system would work best in the free flight mode (which is lots of fun). In Cloud though there are many actions, such as pulling the clouds around or absorbing/releasing them, which is hard to build into a motion capture. This game would work perfectly on Wii though, so get in touch Nintendo!

Watch this video then read the thesis pdf.

Fly

This reminded me of a project I heard of in 2003 called Fly (shown above). Fly was created by Simon Oliver, with design by Duncan Bone, sound by Owen Lloyd and support from Mickey Stretton (now Design Director at AllofUs) (created whilst all at Randommedia).

Using the same control method, the player holds two coloured balls, which are tracked by the ...

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Originally posted on Pixelsumo by chris


NEURAL N.25

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<p><img alt="n25.jpg" src="http://www.turbulence.org/blog/images/n25.jpg" width="109" height="144" border="0" style="float: left; margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px";><h4>new media art. emusic. hacktivism.</h4><p></p>

NEURAL N.25: new media art .Siegfried Zielinski interview. .Olia Lialina interview. Christophe Bruno interview. .Identity in the age of digital technologies. news: Ten-sided, ten identities in a blog, Emotion's Defibrillator, consciousness short circuit, Camera Obscura 2005/1-Inf, memetic photographic virus, Confess.or, one to many confessions, Difference Engine, extracting the metaphysics from the net. reviews: ..books / dvd / cd-rom: Satellite of Love; M.Eraso, A.Ludovico, S.Krekovic - The Mag.net reader; A. Cerveira Pinto - META.morfosis; M.Jahrmann, M.Moswitzer - Ludic Society Magazine #1 + #2; T.Corby - Network Art; V. Baroni - Postcarts; J.Juul - Half-Real.

emusic .Andrea Polli interview. Snog interview. Derek Holzer interview. news: 4'04" Sound not found, Pianolina, the interactive piano, Dewanatron, cranking electronics, eShofar, folk tradition and technology, Amy e Klara, machinic male - dicta. reviews: books / dvd / cd+: A.Hugill - 'Pataphysics; Microscope Session DVD 2.0; Live Cinema 01; G.Kiers+L. van der Velden - Sonic Acts XI; AGF.3 & Sue.C - Mini Movies; V.Moorefield - The Producer as Composer; Y.Kawamura - Slide. .cd reviews: Aphex Twin, Francisco Lopez, Luc Ferrari, John Hegre & Maja Ratkje, Autechre / The Hafler Trio, Doddodo, Howard Stelzer / Giuseppe Ielasi, Jarrod Fowler, Warren Burt, Hyper, Rf, Pure, Alvars Orkester, Miller + Fiam, Rlw, Crawling With Tarts, Scatole Sonore/Impro Ensemble, Product, Incidental Amplifications, Refractions.

hacktivism .Raqs Media Collective interview. Fernando Llamos interview. Hacking Biometrics. news: Monolith, copyright hacking, Un_wiki, Wikipedia radical polemic, Movie Mapper, The Brand Hype Database, Pneumatic Parliament, instant democracy, Zone Interdite, mapping secret territories. reviews: books / dvd / cd+:F.Stalder - Open Cultures and the Nature of Networks, B.Marenko - DiY Survival, M.Gerritzen - Beautiful World ...

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Originally posted on unmediated by Rhizome


State of Play

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Life in the Metaverse

State of Play III: Social Revolutions is the third annual conference on the future of cyberspace, from a legal perspective. Convened by the Institute for Information Law & Policy at New York Law School, the Information Society Project at Yale Law School, and the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School. This year, the conference focused on social relationships in the metaverse and how to build vibrant, flourishing, creative places.

The 2003 conference "State of Play I: Law, Games and Virtual Worlds," introduced the emerging legal, economic, cultural and sociological issues in three-dimensional computer environments. Participants from a variety of different disciplines discussed the impact of virtual worlds on real world law and the rise of law in virtual worlds. Papers explored avatar rights and virtual world identity, among other topics centered on the legal aspects.

"State of Play II: Reloaded" highlighted two themes: the role of intellectual property and governance in virtual worlds. Should we import copyright and trademark into virtual spaces? Can we exclude them? What should be the relationship between real and virtual world economies? Should legislatures protect virtual world property? What are the possibilities for using virtual spaces to practice the activities of real world democracy? Should virtual worlds be treated as separate jurisdictions with their own evolving norms and forms of dispute resolution? What is the potential for using virtual worlds to promote democracy and self-governance?

Archives include video documentation from all three conferences.

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Originally posted on networked_performance by michelle