Posts for June 2006

One Link, Much Great Art

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The online exhibition, 'Link-A' reinstates the good old-fashioned web portal in providing access to eleven important and engaging internet-based art projects. Organized by Media Lab Madrid, the show's site is intensely minimal, with each artwork's title and link arranged in a frame, symbolically encompassing the show's heavy subtitle: 'policies of affectivity, aesthetics of biopower.' Each work is included on the basis of its demonstration of 'contemporary affectivity and its technological mediation.' The international roster of participating artists is about as heavy-hitting as the subtitle, and includes Rob Bevan in collaboration with Tim Wright, Laura Bey, Candy Factory, Collective 8552, David Crawford, Jess Loseby, MTAA, Akira Mori, and Young-hae Chang Heavy Industries. Together, their works construct romantic, melancholy, and otherwise richly dramatic narratives about the past, present, and future of individuals and their intersubjective relationships. The show is accompanied by a trio of very thoughtful essays by Franco Berardi, Michael Hardt, and Juan Martin Prada. A broadband access point is offered for the exhibition, at Madrid's Centro Cultural Conde Duuque, through July 23rd, but considering that this is the online equivalent of a blockbuster museum show, you might consider scoping things out from the comfort of your own internet connection. - Marisa Olson

http://www.vinculo-a.net/01eng.html

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


Newly Launched: The Fair Use Network

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Pen THE FAIR USE NETWORK: INFORMATION & RESOURCES FOR FREE EXPRESSION

This is the site we've all been waiting for, the hub of "all things fair use", a newly launched online resource tailored for artists, scholars and creative people that includes practical resources, reference guides and glossaries, a budding attorney network, and a nifty newsfeed in the left sidebar generated by their internal blog.... brought to you by the folks at the Free Expression Policy Project @ the Brennan Center for Justice, NYU School of Law.

via their homepage: http://fairusenetwork.org

About Us
The Fair Use Network provides information to activists, artists, scholars, and anyone else who has questions about "IP" (intellectual property) law.  Our basic purpose is to support fair use and other free expression safeguards within the law, because free expression is essential to creativity, culture, and a healthy democracy.

The Fair Use Network is part of the Free Expression Policy Project (FEPP), a program of the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law.  It grew out of the findings and recommendations in FEPP's 2005 report, Will Fair Use Survive? Free Expression in the Age of Copyright Control.  The report found massive confusion among artists, scholars, and others about fair use, and a need for pro bono legal help and comprehensible resource materials.

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Originally posted on NEWSgrist - where spin is art by joy garnett


Newly Launched: The Fair Use Network

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THE FAIR USE NETWORK: INFORMATION & RESOURCES FOR FREE EXPRESSION

This is the site we've all been waiting for, the hub of "all things fair use," a newly launched online resource tailored for artists, scholars and creative people that includes practical resources, reference guides and glossaries, a budding attorney network, and a nifty newsfeed in the left sidebar generated by their internal blog.... brought to you by the folks at the Free Expression Policy Project @ the Brennan Center for Justice, NYU School of Law.

via their homepage: http://fairusenetwork.org

About Us
The Fair Use Network provides information to activists, artists, scholars, and anyone else who has questions about "IP" (intellectual property) law. Our basic purpose is to support fair use and other free expression safeguards within the law, because free expression is essential to creativity, culture, and a healthy democracy.

The Fair Use Network is part of the Free Expression Policy Project (FEPP), a program of the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law.  It grew out of the findings and recommendations in FEPP's 2005 report, Will Fair Use Survive? Free Expression in the Age of Copyright Control.  The report found massive confusion among artists, scholars, and others about fair use, and a need for pro bono legal help and comprehensible resource materials.

[....]

A Bit of Background
In the last few decades, the rights of copyright and trademark owners to control the use of their works has increased dramatically.  Corporations have lobbied successfully for longer copyright terms and expanded their control over trademarks through legal doctrines such as "trademark dilution" They also have used cease and desist letters and section 512 takedown notices to try to stop legitimate, fair uses of copyrighted materials, or well-known trademarks, for such purposes as criticism and parody.

The enhancement of IP owners' powers has come at the expense of those who build upon, critique, or make other creative, scholarly, or political uses of existing works. The wholesale shift of rights from the public's to the owner's side of the scale has fundamentally changed the delicate balance in IP law that makes creativity and informed political debate possible.

The combination of rapidly shifting laws and new technologies has left many people uncertain about their rights as users.  In the face of uncertainty, many individuals and groups have understandably steered a conservative path around possible legal landmines. Unfortunately, this response fails to take advantage of significant rights that users retain, even today--first and foremost, the rights to fairly use trademarks or copyrighted material.

Why the Fair Use Network?
How much can you borrow, quote or copy from someone else's work? What happens if you get a "cease and desist" letter from a copyright owner? These and many other questions make "intellectual ...

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Originally posted on NEWSgrist by joy garnett


The Third Eye

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After a long legacy of game, literature and cinema it is easy to forget that the third person perspective is a purely invented perceptual construction, being now deeply rooted in contemporary western culture.

This brilliant experiment by Takehito Etani lifts the third person perspective from its various representations and maps it directly onto himself. As a result he becomes his own operator, his own player.. Here's a video of him taking himself for a walk in Times Square, New York.

Thnx Marta!

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Originally posted on selectparks by Rhizome


Preview

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This is a preview of the new 3" E*Rock DVD+zine.

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Originally posted on Light and Sound by Rhizome


Blast Theory's talk at Sonar

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Well... when i write Blast Theory, i mean one of its members: Matt Adams (i took some extremely loosy pictures of him during his talk, so the portrait of him was stolen on The Age.)

Matt Adams started by giving a brief history of Blast Theory then explained with more details their latest work: The Day of the Figurines.

In the beginning, Blast Theory was particularly interested in British clubbing culture, they were trying to make out art in clubs in the early '90s. Clubbing at the time wasn't a branded activity like it is now (clubs selling their t-shirts and other "merchandising".) Matt background is in theater and he was interested in how people were staging themselves in clubs. In clubs you have a certain control: you can decide to be and stay a spectator or to be the center of attention, to become part of the show. Clubbing were a very fluid space. THe other main interested was: how do you find and build an audience? how does it form? Visual art is usually shown in galleries, galleries have their audience. Artist have a very personal dialogue with their work and get their audience via the gallery. So matt wanted to find other ways to find new audience.

This reflected also a political interest influenced by the Russian constructivism of the '20s and also by the radical forms of theatre that emerged in the 60s and 70s.

Matt wanted to see how culture could have a transformative role and to make art works which are not narrative. Stories have limits. None of us lives a linear life, our life is more fragmented. Looking for works which would be non-narratives while being also accessible for a broad public, he found out that there was already something out there ...

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Boredomresearch Review

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My review of Boredomresearch’s show at TheSpace4 is now online at Furtherfield:

http://www.furtherfield.org/displayreview.php?From=Index&review_id=186

Tags: ,

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Note: Here are the bookends of the review--there's much of interest, in between:

"Boredomresearch have used the three rooms at TheSpace4 to mount something of a retrospective of their artificial life installations. [.....] The experience of Boredomresearch's most successful work is of an imaginative engagement with simulated realities where aesthetics and computation are unified as living processes. These small universes offer both respite and instruction for inhabitants of the world that contains them."

~mo

Originally posted on robmyers by Rhizome


hektor goes CC

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hektor.net
screen shot from hektor.net

hektor.net, my old skool (2000), award-winning and recently archived net.art project (say this ten times fast: The Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media, a Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, of the Cornell University Library) has just been (like, uploading as I hit the publish button) re-released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License. I say something like this on the site:

Sorry to say that since I made this site, I’ve lost all my source flash files (dude, I was like, 23, and just starting out, you know?), but you are welcome to import and re-mix with whatever technologies you see fit / are able to. Click here to download this entire site in one zipped up file (30 MBs of movs, swfs, and html - I can’t believe I ever made sites without CSS).

Why, you ask? Well, it’s in celebration of the first iCommons iSummit, of course! I’ll be heading to Rio (w00t!) as the "Creative Commons Artist in Residence" on Wednesday. Watch this space for live blogging, and a CC/GPL re-release of [odys]elicit, too (will give compiled Apple/PC versions as well as source code, but you’ll need Director and the TTC-Pro Xtra - or their demo versions - for the latter).

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Originally posted on nathaniel and the non-aggressive by Rhizome


V1D3O H4CK P4CK

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Inside jokes are rarely funny to a general audience, but in French internet artist Jimpunk's 'DVblogH4ck,' the public is invited in on the joke. Dvblog.org is one of the web's most popular Quicktime video sites. Such a distinction might imply that its content would consist more exclusively of memes, but the vlog is actually loaded with new and classic artist's videos. This balance made it perfect fodder for Jimpunk, who recently started his own vlog where he posts remixes of Dvblog videos. The increasing popularity of video websites might seem to enable anyone with a US$20 Quicktime Pro account to make movie magic, but Jimpunk's hacks are highly-polished gems resulting from various strains of shredding and pixel-popping. Each takes the medium's realist tradition for a ride and yet maintains an index of its origin. Adding to the fun is English artist Michael Szpakowski, co-manager of DV Blog with Doron Golan, whose 'DVblog H4ck B4ck' remixed Jimpunk's remixes until these indices of origin gave way to abstract geometries of light and color. Collectively, internet users are given three times the stimulation of a single screening. Start in the middle and work your way out. - James Petrie

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Mods & Rockers Installation Views

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Kids Viewing Rodmocker

Kids Viewing Rodmocker 2

Young art consumers viewing the collaboration I did in Toronto with John Parker. The exhibition is "Mods & Rockers." The videos are documented here and the audio is here.

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Originally posted on Tom Moody by tom moody