Posts for May 2006

Ursula Endlicher

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Website Portrait Performances

Ursula Endlicher's Website Portrait Performances (WPPs) consist of graphical visualizations of the hyper-links of a particular website which illustrate the link structure two levels down into it. How the website is written in HTML will define how the links are displayed in the graphic. The grammar of one medium (HTML) is applied to another (graphic).

Furthermore these visualizations are read as so-called "dance notations". Each link is performed depending on how the individual node is defined in the graphic. If a link shows seventy sub-links (HTML) for example, the performance ("dance") will consist of seventy movements. Finally, each link selected by the user also simultaneously displays the real-time URL of the according page of the specific website on a secondary monitor (installation) or window (web).

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The "www.whitehouse.gov" Website Portrait Performance exists as interactive installation with "mouse-chair", projection, secondary monitor and real-time web-feed. It also has a web-based version. Other web-based projects in this series are "www.vatican.va" and "www.morexoptimo.com".

Website Portrait Performances are another manifestation of my ongoing interest and research in translating the Web's grammar into other mediums, in this case by superimposing the link structure of a website onto a graphical representation and performances. With the interactive mouse-chair I developed an interface that engages the whole body; a navigation device which expresses my ongoing longing for alternative human-machine communication interfaces.

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Milan Goes Digital

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Mixed Media is an international showcase of digital, architectural, and audiovisual art taking place in Milan from the 25th to the 28th of May. Not intended as an exhaustive overview of the different fields composing the new media art scene, instead the project positions itself as a space of dialogue, through the organization of exhibitions, meetings, seminars, concerts, and both visual and sonic environments. The new media art program, curated by Silvio Mondino, will feature several installations and software-based works by artists such as Jim Campbell, Aether Architecture, Lemur, Osman Khan, Interaction Design Lab, dotdotdot, Lia, Dextro, Jared Tarbell, Robert Hodgin, Meta, Toxi, Alessandro Capozzo, and Fabio Franchino. The architecture program will be presented through an online exhibition aiming at exploring the relationships between architectural design and digital technologies. And during the three evenings over which the Mixed Media events span, the audiovisual section will showcase the experimental practices put together under the umbrella of live multimedia performance. All of this great work, presented in Italy's coolest city, makes Mixed Media a must-see. - Luis Silva

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Discourse Is a Weapon:

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a Legacy Continues

"The history of most artistic disciplines is full of figures that fulfilled several roles at once, often out of necessity. When mediums or concepts are new and inaccessible to the writers, curators, and producers who can help solidify and critically frame a discipline, it's often left to the artist to explain the new thing. Here, Paddy Johnson surveys various New Media artists who, faced with chronic lack of institutional recognition, have proactively shaped the discourse around their medium through writing and curatorial work." Discourse Is a Weapon: a Legacy Continues by Paddy Johnson, NYFA Current.

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Messages in jars

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Paul De Marinis' The Messenger deals with the interrelationship between electronic communications technologies and modern lifestyle.

The installation splices up old-fashioned telegraphy to electronic e-mail traffic. E-mails are received by a computer and distributed to three systems of output devices that enable installation visitors to experience the messages sensorially:

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- 26 washbasins arrayed in a large oval; each basin is assigned a letter in the alphabet and a unique voice. Built-in loudspeakers serially intone the individual letters of the incoming e-mail.

- 26 dancing skeletons wearing ponchos displaying one of the letters of the alphabet. The letters of the message activate the corresponding skeleton and the chorus line's dance reproduces the text of the e-mail.

- 26 electrolytic jars with metal electrodes in the form of the letters A to Z oscillate and bubble when electricity is passed through them and let the letters of the e-mail glow in color.
Movie.

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The Messenger is inspired by XVIIIth Century physician and naturalist Francesc Salva i Campillo's output device for his telegraph equipment. The system involved an array of 26 servants who, following an electrical shock, would each call out a particular letter of the transmitted message, which could then be understood by a listener.

One of the winners of Ars Electronica 2006. Via ars electronica blog (cool! means that someone else is extensively and professionally covering the festival so this year i'll finally enjoy the festival and won't bother writing about it like a maniac).

Other work by De Marinis
: Fire speaking to you.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Just the TXT Please

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Recent Parsons School of Design grad, Paul Notzold’s “Textual Healing” project examines the public use of text (or SMS) messaging by allowing people to send texts to projected speech bubbles on building facades. From his description: “Using ‘always on’ technology, cell phones with SMS messaging allow an audience to interact with large speech bubbles projected onto a flat surface, like the facade of a building. The bubbles are positioned near windows and doors to encourage an audience to create the conversations happening inside. The audience receives a flyer with the number and simple instructions. A participant sends a text message to the provided phone number and it is then displayed inside the speech bubble. Multiple bubbles may be used and the audience can direct their input to a specific bubble.” I like the idea of connecting the public to the private space of an apartment building or office and allow people on the street to “create” the conversations that might be occurring inside the buildings. This project also reminds me of “Speakers Corner”, a scrolling LED sign in Huddersfield, UK that allowed people to send SMS messages to it from their phones. We’ll probably see a lot more of these public SMS displays in the near future. . .

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Originally posted on coin-operated by Rhizome


Art, Emergence, and the Computational Sublime

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More than the Sum of its Parts

Abstract: This paper looks at some critical and technical issues of relevance to generative art. In particular, it examines the concept of emergence, looking at its historical origins and salient issues surrounding its classification and meaning for developing generative art. These issues include the hierarchy of levels associated with emergence, recognition and ontology of patterns, prediction and determinism. Each of these are then related to attempts to create emergent phenomena with computers for artistic purposes. Several methodologies for developing emergent generative art are discussed including what is termed in the paper "the computational sublime". This definition is considered in relation to historical and contemporary definitions of the sublime and is posited as a way for artists to suggest their work is more than the sum of its parts." Art, Emergence, and the Computational Sublime by Jon McCormack and Alan Dorin. [Related: Ekpurosis]

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


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Drawings with PowerPoint by David Byrne.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


Paul Slocum Deep House for Symphonic Band

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Paul Slocum Deep House

Paul Slocum, Deep House for Symphonic Band and Choir, 2006. Slocum explains on his blog, "It's a dance club hit written for symphonic band and choir. The music plays on the speakers in a loop (about 4 mins long) and the entire score for all the instruments is pinned to the wall between two Sylvania Gro-Lux fluorescents." The music ([5.6 MB .mp3]) is great; a very full, lush orchestrated sound, compositionally minimal but soulful, like the best deep house on vinyl, but with a Steve Reich vibe in the use of symphonic instruments and voices. I like that the score is presented as a series of abstract marks on the wall, a la Sol LeWitt (lighting by Flavin), but that the marks actually correspond to something you can hear with your own ears, both in real space and virtually, by virtue of being published on the Net.

Updated a couple of times, with more words and a link to the tune.

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Originally posted on Tom Moody by tom moody


Perpetual Apocalypse

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End-of-the-world scenarios have always been big in cinema, but 'Em/bedded,' a large-scale, calculatedly chaotic multimedia installation by artists Alan Sondheim and Leslie Thornton, makes Hollywood's imaginings look tame. The project combines Sondheim's videos of morphing cyborgian bodies dancing or engaged in orgiastic sex with Thornton's bloody images of war and her video exploration of the effects of new technologies and violence on our lives. Both are juxtaposed with relics of the past--photographs, book, souvenirs, old prints--that anticipate the decline and fall of language and civilization via technology. Em/bedded assaults the viewer with the images and sounds of an ongoing battle between love and death. Its multi-sensory information overload conveys visions of a futuristic, endlessly mutating Armageddon. Sondheim's laptop performance on the show's opening night, May 27, will feature his real-time written commentary (think improvisatory poetry by an Allen Ginsberg/Leonard Cohen hybrid) overlaid upon a montage of video, audio, and text fragments. Em/bedded will be on view at Santa Monica, California's Track 16 Gallery through June 24. - Marcia Tanner

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DNA-responsive sculpture

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genetec is a proposal by UK based artist Stanza, to build an articulating DNA structure telematically controlled from the internet and responding to unique user input data. The data would be translated into 3d emergent systems thereby creating a personalised dna large scale sculpture.

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Once built this space with unique patterns and shapes would move around as you move around, based on your dna. These shapes will be changed via motion and sensor control. The sensor ie, camera tracking position control, temperature control will mediate the flow of data output onto the displays. The work focuses the merging of the human interface with new architectural philosophies, networked intelligent data and new materiality.

So far, Stanza has established links and partnerships with UCL, and also Vector Foiltec Architecture. A number of specific DNA tests have been carried out for the artist by scientist Mandy Fisher at Hammersmith Hospital, and these tests have given him his own DNA data to begin work with.

See his now legendary Genomixer project, an online artworks inspired by the human genome sequence and developed from dna profiles which were sequenced from his own blood. He also "infected" with his DNA website like the one of the BBC, the ICA and the Tate .

Check also: Peter Yeadon's Transgenic Zoo.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome