Posts for May 2006

Deadly Games

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All too often, public memorials honoring the victims of atrocities fall prey to bureaucratic processes in place to appease the living masses. Joseph DeLappe's newest project represents the work of one individual to honor the thousands of individuals who have now died in the Iraq war. This micro-memorial takes the form of an intervention in 'America's Army,' the online first-person-shooter video game used by the US Army to recruit new soldiers. DeLappe logs into the game with the user name 'dead-in-iraq' and proceeds to use the game's text messaging system to type the names, ages, and dates of death of recently deceased US soldiers in Iraq. Then he does nothing. He simply waits to be shot by other players, dies, and begins the process again, after being 'reincarnated.' Dead In Iraq is a thoughtful co-opting of the tools of digital culture to engage with the political issues raised in an era of high tech war. It is also one of a handful of recent online performances, staged in the diegesis of multiplayer games. The field of 'game art,' itself--of which this live performance is a unique extension--often meets criticism for its perceived lack of seriousness or its indulgence of nostalgia. But DeLappe's evocation of memory, in this game, is no laughing matter. He began the project in March of this year and has already input the names of 250 people killed in action since then. He plans to continue this action until the war ends. Until then, you can view screenshots of his participation in the game, and other users' responses to his messages, on the artist's website. - Marisa Olson

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Deadly Games

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All too often, public memorials honoring the victims of atrocities fall prey to bureaucratic processes in place to appease the living masses. Joseph DeLappe's newest project represents the work of one individual to honor the thousands of individuals who have now died in the Iraq war. This micro-memorial takes the form of an intervention in 'America's Army,' the online first-person-shooter video game used by the US Army to recruit new soldiers. DeLappe logs into the game with the user name 'dead-in-iraq' and proceeds to use the game's text messaging system to type the names, ages, and dates of death of recently deceased US soldiers in Iraq. Then he does nothing. He simply waits to be shot by other players, dies, and then begins the process again, after being 'reincarnated.' Dead In Iraq is a thoughtful co-opting of the tools of digital culture to engage with the political issues raised in an era of high tech war. It is also one of a handful of recent online performances, staged in the diegesis of multiplayer games. The field of 'game art,' itself--of which this live performance is a unique extension--often meets criticism for its perceived lack of seriousness or its indulgence of nostalgia. But DeLappe's evocation of memory, in this game, is no laughing matter. He began the project in March of this year and has already input the names of 250 people killed in action since then. He plans to continue this action until the war ends. Until then, you can view screenshots of his participation in the game, and other users' responses to his messages, on the artist's website. - Marisa Olson

http://www.unr.edu/art/DELAPPE/Gaming/Dead_In_Iraq/dead_in_iraq%20JPEGS.html

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


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Video of Sachiko Kodama's fascinating magnetic fluid art project "Protrude, Flow."

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


Hybrid muscle

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Hybrid Muscle was both a work and exhibition space, built in Chiang Maï in Thaïland, that would generate its own electricity and thus be "unplugged" from the power grid.

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The engine was driven by the muscle power of an albino Buffalo. The buffalo worked a few hours a day to lift a steel counterweight. Once freed the buffalo would lounge around the rice field and the mechanical energy stored was turned into electrical energy to power ten light bulbs, laptops, mobile phones.

Commissioned in 2002 to R&Sie; architects who worked on the project with Philippe Parreno and Rirkrit Tiravanija.

See also R&Sie; architecture's project for the future Bangkok Art Museum that feeds of the city's pollution and (Un)Plug Building, a concept of building that gains its energy from the sun

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Your face is safe with me

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Your face is safe with me, by Tiffany Holmes, is an animation generated from a camera recording live in the gallery and from a database of images the artist collects from Chicago locations surveilled by security cameras.

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"What the viewer will see is the computer playing video games against itself for no purpose," said Holmes, "and the surveillance images, which are fairly recognizeable, come up from time to time in the games."

The surveillance images of the visitors in the gallery are fed to Pac Man or become the bricks that imprison the player in Breakout.

A large projection portrays the computer playing simple videogames with itself. The games parodied refer to the proliferation of surveillance camera networks and their potential to be perceived as hostile intruders in community spaces--as envisioned in the updated Space Invaders game. In one videogame, Pacman chomps through a single CCTV screenshot to reveal several others--alluding to our culture's voracious appetite for covert imagery. The new Asteroids® play involves a tiny ship blasting surveillance camera images into ever smaller ones, alluding to the immense amount of banal imagery generated daily by CCTV networks. The computer used in this exhibition deletes all images gathered live within one hour.

Surveillance-based games: the Zone project, Joey Skaggs's Art Attack.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Digit Media Festival call

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Digit Media Festival call

I've been involved with this for a couple of years. It started out as a a film festival but I've been pushing to turn it into a new media festival. For the film festival you have to send in your video with a 25 dollar fee. There's also a call for new media proposals which is free. The cool events will be at the Roebling Bridge for sound art and Bethel Woods Art Center (the old woodstock hippie site). we're calling this Podstock.

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Originally posted on post.thing.net - A lean, mean, media machine. by Rhizome


gh_news_002

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G.H. Hovagimyan:

Sound Art is everywhere these days. Peter Sinclair and his

experimental soundlab Locus Sonus have a video up on the web called

Audio Geo.
<http://nujus.net:8000/locus/perfLS0406.mp4> I'm trying to get

Locus Sonus over here for the Digit Festival in August.
<http://www.artsalliancesite.org/> The grant forms are in and we

are keeping our fingers crossed.

MTAA has a podcast blog called To Be Listened To...
<http://mtaa.net/2bl2/> It's also a sort of audio exquisite corps.

You can upload a sound work of your own to anyone of the 8 original

feeds. I checked out my seed which is called, In a park in Europe as

you wait for the sun to rise and the snow to stop. There was one

other upload from
Anni Abrahams & Jan de Weille. <http://www.bram.org/sound/
index.html> It's a really terrific bit of electronica. This site is

quite interesting and taking the time to explore the sound art is

very rewarding. The bonus is that if you make sound art you can add

your file to the database.

Internet video is also quite big, especially viral video. A good

place to look is Doron Golan's DVblog. <http://www.dvblog.org>

Doron's doing a terrific job of presenting a good mix of experimental

videos and oddities. This site has become so popular that Doron had

to go to a bigger server.
My video Smart House <http://www.dvblog.org/?submit=Search&s=Smart
+House> got 5,000 downloads in one week.

I put up two new rants for RANTAPOD <http://spaghetti.nujus.net> I've

added some simple video techniques and editing chops to enhance the

impact. I've been working with the idea of using digital ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by G.H. Hovagimyan


Call for Entries

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beate zurwehme:

The Media Art Friesland Festival 2006, which takes place from September
the 13th till October the 1st, is the tenth edition of the festival.
This anniversary will be celebrated with a special and large programme.
Recent work from all over the world will be shown in film and video
screenings, presentations, exhibitions, conferences and performances.
 
Do you want to participate in the 10th edition of the festival? Media
Art Friesland asks all artists and students to send in their work;
video, film, cd-rom and internet projects, installations and
performances.
 
Deadline for the entries is 1st June 2006!
 
 
For more information, visit our website at www.mediaartfriesland.nl or
send an e-mail to info@mediaartfriesland.nl.
 
 
Programme of the 10th Media Art Friesland Festival
 
The Video Salon presents an international program with a high-quality
selection of recent experimental short films and videos, animations,
new forms of narration and documentation, accompanied by special
programmes.
 
Multimedia installations by graduation students of Dutch Academies of
Art, Media Technology and Design are presented in the exhibition Young
Talent and the exhibition Spotlight shows work by artists worldwide.
 
In the Artist in Residence program young talented artists are given the
possibility for personal development and presentation of work made in
Friesland.
 
The Computer Gallery presents non-linear works on CD-Rom, DVD and
Internet by international artists.
 
Sound Vision is filled with multimedia stage shows as well as other
live acts that have become part of audiovisual arts.
 
The Experience gives insight into current media trends and projects.
The cross over of various genres and different disciplines bridge the
conventional divide between art, science and technology. Experts answer
questions on cultural understanding and present training concepts.
Artists, visual designers and developers show their work. In
co-operation with Dutch Media Colleges the Experience presents the
various positions ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by beate zurwehme


Robotic Action Painter

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Artist Robot Signs Own Work

RAP (Robotic Action Painter) is a new generation of painting robots designed for Museum or long exhibition displays. It is completely autonomous and need very little assistance and maintenance.
RAP creates it's own paintings based on an artificial intelligence algorithm, it decides when the work is ready and signs in the right bottom corner with its distinctive signature.
The algorithm combines initial randomness, positive feedback and a positive/negative increment of 'color as pheromone' mechanism based on a grid of nine RGB sensors.
Also the 'sense of rightness' - to determine when the painting is ready - is achieved not by any linear method, time or sum, but through a kind of pattern recognition system.

Robotic Action Painter
Leonel Moura (with IdMind), 2006

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Originally posted on networked_performance by luis


(re)ACTOR: THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON DIGITAL LIVE ART

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Call for PAPERS, PRESENTATIONS AND PERFORMANCES

(re)ACTOR: THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON DIGITAL LIVE ART September 11, 2006 The Octagon @ Queen Mary, University of London London, England, UK, Deadline for 2-page submissions 26 May 2006. In cooperation with HCI 2006: ENGAGE; The 20th British HCI Group conference in co-operation with ACM

DIGITAL LIVE ART is the intersection of human-computer interaction (HCI), live art and computing. This conference seeks to bring together practitioners and academics from the varying worlds of live art, computing and human-computer interaction for a lively debate and event which will explore this emerging field. Our specific context focuses on club cultures as a living context for digital live arts practices. Our expected outcomes are to create a community of digital live artists and to present strategies for designing, developing and evaluating Digital Live Art. Such an event provides an opportunity to open up conversations between digital art and live performance and will allow us to explore how it is used to increase our understanding of human-computer interaction in general.

The notion of Digital Live Art is that of a hybrid art form which focuses on presence and presupposes the digital as a way of making live engagements. Our particular interest is in exploring the relationship that develops between performers, participants and observers within playful contexts and how Digital Live Art may move people to performative interaction and communal engagement.

THE CONFERENCE

The conference will include both daytime presentations and an evening ambient after party. The daytime event will include a keynote panel with Charles Kriel, Philip Auslander, and Jon Dovey.

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo