Posts for May 2006

Turbulence Commission:

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HRRA-LogoAni.gif

HRRAAGHP-TING!

HRRAAGHP-TING!--by Olen Hsu, Dana Karwas and Steven Lam--is an Internet/video collaboration that connects image and sound filenames available on the web to create an infinite chain of associations. Extruded in real time, and in a linear format, they collapse the Internet�

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


SAVE THE INTERNET! | joe kral

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SAVE THE INTERNET! Congress is now pushing a law that would end the free and open Internet as we know it. Read all about the proposed law and sign the petition.

More info at sfgate.com, The New Yorker and Business Week. Pass the word...

Nabbed from Fecal Face.

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Originally posted on KALIBER10000 by Rhizome


Home-Maker has a new home online

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Jeanie Finlay:

Home-Maker by Jeanie Finlay is now available to view online
What makes a house a home, how does this change if you can��'��"�t leave?
http://www.home-maker.org.uk

Home-Maker, the interactive documentary project has been touring UK venues for the last 2 years. At the final venue, Hatton Gallery, a team from Heaton Used furniture came in and turned off the computers, packed up the dolls, furniture and ornaments and dismantled the set as they would whenever they perform a House Clearance. Now the only place to view Home-Maker is online.

In an online flash environment built by Gareth Howell you can visit Florrie, Roy, Lilian, Betty, Aiko-san, Emi-san and Monji-san in their new online home and hear the stories linked to the belongings in their Derbyshire and Tokyo living rooms in over an hour of streaming mini documentaries.

"This largely unprecedented, highly novel approach to portraiture brings up all kinds of touching details of life as it is lived between four walls, amid the dreadfully small collections of significant belongings, haunted by the enduring presence of lost loved ones...." Mick Martin, The Guardian.

Home-Maker is the result of two residencies which took place in the living rooms of seven housebound, older people in South Derbyshire, England, and Tokyo, Japan. Jeanie Finlay spent time with each of the seven people, getting to know their histories, preoccupations and passions, creating video and panoramic portraits of each of them in their homes.

A Ruby project made with Peoplexpress and Muse Company. In association with On the Edge Research. Supported by Arts Council of England , EM Media, UK Film Council, YOTA and Esmée Fairbairn Charitable Trust. Design by Ruby. Flash online exhibition by Gareth Howell. Winner of a Canon International Digital Creators Web Award.
--
Jeanie Finlay
Ruby Digital
jeanie ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Jeanie Finlay


Miao Xiaochun The Last Judgment in Cyberspace

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g

Wu Hung curates Beijing-based Miao Xiaochun's newest photography and video, which reexamine Michelangelo's "Last Judgment" using digital technology.

Miao Xiaochun has generated a 3-D model of his body and substituted his image for each of the 400 figures in Michelangelo's painting. Using software to manipulate the model into different positions, he then integrated these 3-D figures into a virtual space based on Michelangelo's composition. He could then travel within the painting like a tourist, taking photos as he went along, from within the pictorial frame as well as from without. The artist worked with three assistants for six months to create these works.

Wu Hung writes, "What do the figures in Michelangelo's Last Judgement - not only Christ and the Virgin but also the angels, the saints, the Damned, and the Blessed - see at this fatal moment? -- What do they behold within the vast, mythical space in the fresco amidst a cosmic movement that is simultaneously orderly and chaotic? To Miao Xiaochun, to answer these questions means to enter the painting and to assume the varied gazes of the painted figures."

Miao Xiaochun's use of technology provokes new ways of seeing. Viewing the icon from inside and outside the picture frame raises such fundamental questions as "What lies beyond and after the Last Judgment?" and "How is the importance of main characters affected when rotating the pictorial space makes their positions peripheral?" Director Julie Walsh remarks: "the sheer scale of Miao Xiaochun's reinterpretation is mind-boggling. The physical reality of these photos is monumental. Miao Xiaochun has pioneered a new way of body-surfing through cyberspace in search of meaning."

Mr. Miao's photographs have been seen in museums and biennials around the world including solo shows at the Beijing Art Museum and Shanghai Art Museum ...

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Originally posted on WiFi-ArT.com by Christophe


Mind to Mind, Era to Era

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In the 1960s, artists working with video and television had revolution on their mind. As Nam June Paik wrote in the first issue of the publication Radical Software, 'If revolution meant for Russians in 1920s electrification... then the revolution in the 60s means electronicification... mind to mind... planet to planet...' This utopian spirit, this belief that broadcast technology could be used as a tool to affect social change has returned repeatedly in decades since. 'Flipped Chips' is an evening of video curated by prolific artist duo LoVid, to be held at Ocularis, in Brooklyn, tonight. The program pairs early video artists, like Paik, Dan Sandin, and Steina and Woody Vasulka, who built their own audio-visual technologies, with a younger generation of artists doing the same. These include noTendo, Cory Arcangel, Paul Slocum, Karl Klomp, and collective Paper Rad. The juxtaposition highlights a difference in their two respective eras. Unlike the early generation for whom video was entirely new, these younger artists were born with TV and socialized by the net. Variously hacked together or carefully programmed, kitschy or politicized, their works speak to a more enmeshed relationship with mainstream media. Discern the generational difference for yourself: In what form does this group of DIY tech pioneers carry on the early flame of media revolution? - Lauren Cornell

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Mind to Mind, Era to Era

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In the 1960s, artists working with video and television had revolution on their mind. As Nam June Paik wrote in the first issue of the publication Radical Software, 'If revolution meant for Russians in 1920s electrification... then the revolution in the 60s means electronicification... mind to mind... planet to planet...' This utopian spirit, this belief that broadcast technology could be used as a tool to affect social change has returned repeatedly in decades since. 'Flipped Chips' is an evening of video curated by prolific artist duo LoVid, to be held at Ocularis, in Brooklyn, tonight. The program pairs early video artists, like Paik, Dan Sandin, and Steina and Woody Vasulka, who built their own audio-visual technologies, with a younger generation of artists doing the same. These include noTendo, Cory Arcangel, Paul Slocum, Karl Klomp, and collective Paper Rad. The juxtaposition highlights a difference in their two respective eras. Unlike the early generation for whom video was entirely new, these younger artists were born with TV and socialized by the net. Variously hacked together or carefully programmed, kitschy or politicized, their works speak to a more enmeshed relationship with mainstream media. Discern the generational difference for yourself: In what form does this group of DIY tech pioneers carry on the early flame of media revolution? - Lauren Cornell

http://www.ocularis.net/

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


Digital Culture in Brazil

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Digital Culture in Brazil:

monochrom and the Austrian Green Party organized a panel discussion about Brazil's open source and digital rights programme.

Guests: Claudio Prado, Coordinator of Digital Policy of the Ministry of Culture of Brazil Eva Lichtenberger, Member of European Parliament Marie Ringler, Member of the City Parliament of Vienna, Culture and Technology Host: Michel Reimon.

Thanks to Radio Netwatcher the talk is now online.

---> http://www.monochrom.at/digital-culture-in-brazil/

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by johannes grenzfurthner


[FRAY] Conference + After (Party) Event

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// jonCates:

[FRAY] Conference SATURDAY MAY 13 @ 2 PM http://fvnm.info/fray/2006.05.13 Film, Video & New Media Dept @ The School of the Art Institute of Chicago Room 1307 in the MacLean Building 112 S. Michigan Ave CHI IL .US FREE

Join [FRAY] for discussions and presentations on connective and collaborative New Media and Digital Arts with Annette Barbier (UNREAL-ESTATES and Interactive Arts and Media Department Columbia College), Ryan Griffis (The Temporary Travel Office and The School of Art & Design University of Illinois at Champaign Urbana), Mark Hansen (Professor in English Language & Literature, Cinema & Media Studies; University of Chicago), Lynn Marie Kirby (California College of the Arts), Rob Ray (DEADTECH and dorkbot Chicago), Lincoln Schatz (The Upgrade! Chicago) and Daniel Tucker (AREA Chicago).

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by // jonCates


The Blue Vein, Secret Zen Garden, etc.

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A slide show (NY Times) of commisioned pieces from the collection of Ohio art collector Andy Stillpass, one of America's most radical and eclectic contemporary-art collectors. This is what happens if you decide to spend your fortune by having artists run around your place rearranging books, filling drawers, painting the house, etc.

Rob Pruitt's Idea No. 22 Fill a desk drawer with gravel and make a secret Zen garden (1999):

Secret Zen Garden

Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster rearranged a bookshelf to create The Blue Vein (1993) and Rirkrit Tiravanija later countered her with The Red Threat (1994-96):

The Blue Vein

Related: There is Nothing Wrong in This Whole Wide World (photos/description) was a 2004 public installation at Adobe Bookshop in San Francisco. The store allowed its 20,000 books to be reclassified by color. McSweeney's interviewed Chris Cobb, the idea man behind the event. (thx, Stephen)

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Originally posted on Signal vs. Noise by Matt


Of Exactitude in Manchester

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The precision of maps has long been considered an issue of scale. Both Jorge Luis Borges and Lewis Carroll have written about the absurd desire for total geographic mastery that leads to the crafting of a map at the scale of the actual place being described. Scale may be one way of thinking about the fallibility of maps but, perhaps more importantly, the location of authority is another challenge or limitation of cartography. The singularity of voices expressed under such a model often distances the map from those who inhabit its terrain. Yet some folks in Manchester (UK) are trying to disrupt the authoritative power of map-makers by employing 'citizen cartography' in a project entitled 'Mapchester.' On May 13-14, as a prelude to this year's Futuresonic Festival, members of the public can help map Manchester, bringing their own tools, or receiving hands-on training with provided gear. Adding to already existing open-source mapping projects, like OpenStreetMap.org, Mapchester is a wiki-based project, inviting people to create a map as 'a guide for a festival created on collaborative and open principles.' Futuresonic's organizers see the project as 'a test-case festival guide,' determining the character of the city and the way in which people seek to inhabit it. The issues raised by the project suggest that we should start supplementing scale with perspective: Along with a key to the scale of a map, one might now expect to find a key to the perspective of the map makers. - Ryan Griffis

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