Posts for May 2006

Playing in Manchester

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FutureSonic 2006 || Urban Play
Manchester, UK
20-23 July

"Imagine a world where the city is a digital canvas, the street a gallery, performances happening in a thousand moving places at once. There are art forms out there, struggling into the light, and a new kind of festival.

This is where people take over the city and use the technology that surrounds us for creative, experimental, challenging ends. Some call this media art, others locative media. We call it urban play.

OFF THE MAP Lose yourself in the glitches as you glide over the deserts and canyons of Arizona, collaborate to remix the sounds of your city, get lost in Manchester for the weekend! Includes world premiers and UK-firsts.

INSTRUMENT An exhibition of artist-made instruments, noise generators, image manipulators, head twisters. Featuring sCrAmBlEd?HaCkZ!, Toshio Iwai, Zachery Lieberman, Victor Gama and many others.

SOCIAL TECHNOLOGIES SUMMIT AND MORE Explore the creative, political and social potential of new technologies. Conferences and artist talks include the Social Technologies Summit; PLAN conference ft. Masaki Fujihata, Atau Tanaka and more.

GET INVOLVED Be a part of the festival... join international and local artists, get skilled up in workshops, or get your hands dirty in participatory events."

Thanks Drew!

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Originally posted on Space and Culture by Anne


Radical Displacements

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Sabrina Raaf's mechanical and robotic sculptures, installations, electronic wearables, and digitally manipulated photographs are all speculative fictions. They anticipate a not-so-distant futuristic world in which smart drugs, genetic engineering, experiments with anti-gravity, and climate change have radically altered human perceptions of time, space, nature, and identity. In 'Icelandic Rift,' a kinetic sculptural installation representing a vision of agricultural and industrial activity in a zero-gravity environment, Raaf connects four starkly engineered yet sensuously biomorphic architectural structures floating above the floor in a system of artificial 'islands.' Inspired by the seemingly extraterrestrial landscapes of Iceland, this synthetic ecosystem contains reservoirs of dense black Ferrofluid (liquid magnet) made to spin, rise, twitch, or travel by electronically powered hard magnets and electromagnets that symbolize the systems' energy sources. Vaguely familiar yet unnervingly alien, the scenarios envisioned in Raaf's work offer a sense of the future that's paradoxically comforting, marvelous, and beautiful, yet fraught with incipient dread. 'Icelandic Rift' and other projects are currently on view, through June 3, in 'rift --> ad-rift,' the artist's solo exhibition at Chicago's Wendy Cooper Gallery. - Marcia Tanner

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Radical Displacements

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Sabrina Raaf's mechanical and robotic sculptures, installations, electronic wearables, and digitally manipulated photographs are all speculative fictions. They anticipate a not-so-distant futuristic world in which smart drugs, genetic engineering, experiments with anti-gravity, and climate change have radically altered human perceptions of time, space, nature, and identity. In 'Icelandic Rift,' a kinetic sculptural installation representing a vision of agricultural and industrial activity in a zero-gravity environment, Raaf connects four starkly engineered yet sensuously biomorphic architectural structures floating above the floor in a system of artificial 'islands.' Inspired by the seemingly extraterrestrial landscapes of Iceland, this synthetic ecosystem contains reservoirs of dense black Ferrofluid (liquid magnet) made to spin, rise, twitch, or travel by electronically powered hard magnets and electromagnets that symbolize the systems' energy sources. Vaguely familiar yet unnervingly alien, the scenarios envisioned in Raaf's work offer a sense of the future that's paradoxically comforting, marvelous, and beautiful, yet fraught with incipient dread. 'Icelandic Rift' and other projects are currently on view, through June 3, in 'rift --> ad-rift,' the artist's solo exhibition at Chicago's Wendy Cooper Gallery. - Marcia Tanner

http://www.raaf.org/

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


SONARAMA 2006

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Year of Japan

As part of its "Year of Japan," Sonar presents Sonarama 2006, featuring two of the brightest stars in the firmament of Japanese electronic culture, Ryoji Ikeda and Toshio Iwai. "Datamatics", the new audiovisual project by Ikeda, and TENORI-ON, a digital musical instrument created by Iwai for the XXIst century, constitute a unique opportunity to assess the future of the new media in relation to advanced music. Along with this event, increasingly popular participatory communities such as Freesound, FlxER or Digitalmusician.net, as well as open-source creative platforms such as Arduino, Supercollider or Blender will also play a prominent role. And all of this without sacrificing a selection of the most innovative proposals taking place within our borders, as represented by AB, Arbol + Obionlab, La Màquina de Turing, Raw and Earth, Wind and Firewire.

Sonarama focuses on the latest developments in new media. Among this year's activities will be the usual concerts, installations, and technology demonstrations as well as medialabs and software presentations. For a few years now, Sonarama's has been held at the Centre d´Art Santa Mónica, the setting for the programmed activities of Sonar by Day. Centre D'art Santa Mònica (Rambla de Santa Mònica, 7) >From 12:00 to 22:00. 15, 16 and 17 June.

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Emotion's Defibrilator

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Tobias Grewenig has conceived the installation Emotion's Defibrilator as a play on the clichés of consciousness-manipulation through electronics. His piece doesn't deliver any content as such, but instead tries to reduce the media on their pure physiological effect on the recipient. In Grewenig's view, the bodily effects of media have rarely been considered and often they range from conspiracy theories about subliminal messages to almost folkloristic ideas about the effects of electro-magnetic pollution.

The user of the installation, wearing an oxygen mask and a pincer on his left forefinger that will measure his/her pulse, puts his head into a big sphere. By placing the hands on two metalic spheres, the equipment is set in motion. First, bio data such as respiration, pulse and skin resistance are measured by the sensors and sent to the software to define the starting parameters. There are various sources of audio and a screen within the sphere. In relation to the data picked up from the body, the audio resonates, tiny electric shocks are delivered via the metallic spheres while the screen shows a flickering image of the user which is being interrupted by "subliminals". When the user takes the hands off the spheres, the installation stops.

Grewenig says that it's fascinating to observe how the electronic equipment, although basically off-the-shelf material, starts frightening its user and turns into something profoundly unpredictable. This already happens when the sensoric input is roughly at the level of everyday city-life. (Well, plus electric shocks, that is.)

Related: Dunne and Raby's Placebo Objects and Hertzian Tales, Death Before Disko by Herwig Weiser.

Via neural.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Eryk Salvaggio

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MySpaces

MySpaces is a project about the projection of the self that we must make onto social networking sites such as friendster and myspace. Usually, this projection reduces us to a few paragraphs designed to be read by anyone. This project is an attempt to create a real sense of physical intimacy, by changing my top 8 to reflect my relationships with various parts of my own body.

In theory, the idea is the first step towards the "myspacing" of the intimacy of a sexual act, where the connections of body parts are seen as connections of the associations one has with the body parts. i.e., if another participant created a similar project, and we charted the relationship between both of our body parts through the lens of our individual relationships, quite literally a kind of intimate sexual encounter would emerge between the two of us, as the profiles of our body parts communicated with one another through the comments board on each profile. [posted by Eryk on salsabomb]

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


“Communication Mods” in Toronto

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Communication Mods open in Toronto

"Communication Mods", a show of interactive works by Mark Argo opens tonight at the Harbourfront Centre in Toronto.

York Quay Centre, Harbourfront Centre, Toronto
May 13th - July 9th
Opening Reception: May 12th, 7-9pm

Direction

"Communication Mods" features five works that explore human-to-human communication through the process of modification. Using technologies such as WiFi, Bluetooth and SMS each piece asks the audience to participate by submitting some of their personal media - music, photos and videos - using laptops and cameraphones. The end result is a snapshot of a particular community at a specific time and place though the catalog of collected media.

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Originally posted on see art / make art by ann


ITP Spring Show

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I just wanted to write a quick post about the ITP Spring Show. A friend of mine talked me into going on Tuesday and it turned out to be a very interesting experience. The ITP Sring Show is where graduate computer science students at NYU showcase projects they've been working on all semester (thesis projects or some kind of academic thing). Most of the exhibitions fell into one of three categories: very artsy, educational toys or a mobile based web 2.0 app. Obviously I was very interested in the mobile apps (at least from a browserless perspective), although there was some interesting projects like the live action super mario brothers or the drawing produces from conversations on blogs. I think that MoBeeLine is one of the coolest things I've seen in a long time.

Out of the mobile/web 2.0 apps (hence forth refered to as "mobile 2.0"), I saw a lot of innovative projects and some emerging trends. Here are some of my favorites:

Snagu.com, the mobile scavenger hunt. Very interactive and potentially addictive. Everyday they send you a word and you have to find a picture that matches it. Then your photo is compared with others with the same word and the commuity votes on which photos are the best. An interesting use of mobile technology and bringing a web based game into "real life".

PlacesToDo is a mobile 2.0 app that allows you to set up a "to do list" of places by sending the location via SMS to a server. It logs the location and what you wanted to do there (examples are the store, an art gallery you walk by or a hot girl's apt). Then you can share the list in a social fashion. Useful app ...

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Originally posted on unmediated by Rhizome


Keeping it Amateur

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Are you a pro at surfing the internet? Do you consider your knack for excavating the hidden jewels of the world wide web an art? You're not alone. The internet's expanding cornucopia of wonders has parlayed into a more conceptually rigorous genre of internet art that concerns itself with the specifics of being online. 'Take It To The Net,' an exhibition on view at London's Vilma Gold gallery through 4 June, presents a handful of international artists who both cull and translate their material to and from the internet. 'What is or is not conceived of as art is of less importance in an era where the amateur as producer has become the professional,' says curator Hanne Mugaas. 'The Internet has opened the floodgates for producers, and the emphasis now lies in the hands of those who access the information.' Included in the show are Jean Baptiste Bayle's website circumventing download laws by offering hot MP3's played in reverse, and his archive of covers of Michael Jackson's 'Billie Jean.' Paul Davis exhibits well-designed mixtapes and Michael Bell-Smith's video collage of twelve chapters of R.Kelly's 'Trapped in the Closet' show visualizes the compelling conventions of the 'hiphopera' genre. Works by Seth Price, Paper Rad, Takeshi Murata, and Thomas Barbey round out this aurally-pleasing exhibition while reflecting on the nature of internet fandom and the syntax of surfing. - Marisa Olson

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ACM Multimedia Arts Program Call for Art/Papers

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Alejandro Jaimes:

** CALL FOR ART/PAPERS

ACM Multimedia 2006 Interactive Arts Program
Santa Barbara, California (USA), October 22-28, 2006
http://www.mat.ucsb.edu/acmmm06/arts/

EXTENDED DEADLINE * June 1, 2006

Sponsored by ACM SIGMM. In collaboration with Leonardo.
Supported by Intel.

ACM Multimedia is the premier annual multimedia conference. The ACM MM Interactive Arts Program brings together the arts and multimedia communities to create the stage to explore, discuss, and push the limits for the advancement of both multimedia technology through the arts, and the arts through multimedia technology.

We invite artists working with digital media and researchers in technical areas to submit their original contributions to the following two tracks:

CONFERENCE: papers describing interactive multimedia artworks, tools, applications, and technical approaches for creative uses of multimedia content and technology. We particularly encourage papers with a strong technical content written by artists, as well as technical papers with a strong art component.

MULTIMEDIA ART EXHIBITION*: "Remote: Networked Realities & Prospective Locative Hacks." We seek multimedia artworks that raise issues related communication (human-human, human-computer-human, etc.) and that place a strong emphasis on the role of the notion of awareness, be it cultural, linguistic, network-centric, spatial or geospatial. The emphasis for the exhibition is on interactive art works that realize powerful artistic concepts using multimedia content and technologies. Emerging and established artists are strongly encouraged to submit.


Accepted papers will be published in the ACM Multimedia Conference proceedings and a selection of the works accepted will be published in a Leonardo Gallery in the Leonardo Journal and on line in the Leonardo Electronic Almanac.

All submissions (short papers, long papers, and art works) are due JUNE 1, 2006
(firm, extended deadline!).

Please see the website for details on conference topics, exhibition, etc.
**.
http://www.mat.ucsb.edu/acmmm06/arts/
Please direct any ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Alejandro Jaimes