Posts for May 2006

GameZone DeSingel

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For the fist time ever we'll be showing three of our favorite game installations at one festival: PainStation, ////furminator and Mr. Punch will be at the Gamezone DeSingel in Antwerp, Belgium. If you live anywhere near, this is the ultimate chance to experience our furry flavor!


Location:DeSingel Art Center, Antwerp
Date:May 24, 2006 - May 28, 2006
URL: http://www.gamezonedesingel.be/

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Interview of Marc Bohlen

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Marc Bohlen's website has provided me with some amazing stories ever since i started blogging: from the Open Biometrics Project that i posted back in 2004, to the Universal Whistling Machine, first prize at Vida 7.0, and the cursing Amy and Klara.

Marc is trained in Stone Masonry (sic), Art History and Electrical Engineering and Robotics. He has been an invited speaker at Cornell University, Harvard University, The Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, the Banff New Media Institute and the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, etc. Marc is currently directing the MediaRobotics Lab at the University of Buffalo (Department of Media Study).

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Matchbox 2005 and Judas

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lighttank1.jpg lighttank2.jpg

Stanislav Vajce is currently showing two of his amazing robotic pieces as part of the informARTics-exhibition at ZKM Karlsruhe. The first one, "Matchbox 2005" is a very reduced and tiny light tank, which in fact is an autonomous vehicle that will continously explore a mock-up battlefield. It's got a lifesize puppet of the artist sitting in the hatch, too. For Vajce, light tanks are the technical achievement where great mobility meets maximal destruction and disruption of the social fabrics they come across.

The second piece works a play on military technologies as well: "Judas" comes with the slogan "Digital is better" (Tocotronic?) and is a six-legged robot stuffed into a cute blue jumpsuit. It as well will roam its surroundings, but what looks like a head is an array of sensors which enables it to recognize patterns, letters and allegedly even read. It looks cute in its "dogishness" (Vajce) but actually it's a "little snitch" that will eventually "send an army of light tanks" your way.

Don't miss his hilarious website Maschinismus.

Related: Tom Sachs' Island.

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Originally posted on post.thing.net - A lean, mean, media machine. by Rhizome


With Enemies Like This...

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Wiretaps, leaks, and whistle-blowing have recently become popular topics of discussion within the US . The current Administration's secrecy seems to depend increasingly upon a lack of secrecy for everyone else, as journalists fight to keep their sources private and activists find themselves targeted by the FBI. One assumes that social networking sites like Friendster are under surveillance... So where can conspiracy-minded people get together? Perhaps on Sinister, a social software tool for our collective dark side. Managed by the suspicious team of Cassandra Rand, Georgia Underwood, and Annina R

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On Everything by Pall Thayer

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On Everything
an art project by Pall Thayer
2006

"On Everything" generates a real-time audio/visual presentation of everything by appropriating material being shared by the worldwide public in the form of shared images and diaries. The source material is endless, thus the work goes on forever. Material is synthesized, mixed and, ultimately, abstracted, to allow for varied interpretation. "On Everything" knows nothing of the content of these materials. It reflects everything while reflecting on nothing. That is up to the viewer.

You will be asked to "trust" an application. The application in question is a Java based Mp3 player that allows a live Mp3 stream to be played through a web page. Please click "trust" to enjoy the art work.

http://pallit.lhi.is/on_everything/

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Originally posted on post.thing.net - A lean, mean, media machine. by Rhizome


Public Broadcast Cart in Berlin - June/July

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From June 1st through July 17th, I will be participating in a sound art festival in Berlin - Sonambiente 2006. The festival organizers have invited me to participate with the Public Broadcast Cart - traversing the streets of Berlin. In preparation for the festival, I have revamped the project's website, adding to the site lots of info that others may find useful, such as how to build your own cart. Keeping with the goal of the project as a tool for civil empowerment and to generate discussion surrounding increasing control of dissemination media by very few wealthy private entities the site is intended as an informational repository surrounding radio transmission in the hands of the public.

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Originally posted on Structural Patterns by Rhizome


With Enemies Like This...

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Wiretaps, leaks, and whistle-blowing have recently become popular topics of discussion within the US . The current Administration’s secrecy seems to depend increasingly upon a lack of secrecy for everyone else, as journalists fight to keep their sources private and activists find themselves targeted by the FBI. One assumes that social networking sites like Friendster are under surveillance... So where can conspiracy-minded people get together? Perhaps on Sinister, a social software tool for our collective dark side. Managed by the suspicious team of Cassandra Rand, Georgia Underwood, and Annina Rüst, Sinister is a connection to underground chat worlds revolving around gardening, real estate, and finance, via the web, IRC, and telephone. One can call access numbers provided on the Sinister Calling Card to listen in on ongoing conversations. More than a mere communication platform, the Sinister website uses theories developed by researchers at Rensellear Polytechnic Institute to analyze the 'shape' of communication patterns in order to reveal the topic of discussion. Sure, conspiracies simmered before social software, but have they ever had their own calling card? - Ryan Griffis

http://www.sinister-network.com/

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


IP Collage

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Distinguishes Participation from Interactivity

IP Collage--by Aphid Stern--is a participative net art piece in which the numbers of each visitor's IP address are added to an image. The four 8-bit numbers that make up the address are recontextualized into php's shape functions in the order they are required: x,y,w,h (x,y coordinate pair & width/height) as well as color: r,g,b,a (red, green, blue, alpha) to create a rectangle of a specific color (& transparency) at a specific location. Viewing the piece changes it permanently.

Generally, 'surfing the net' is thought of as a unidirectional process - one navigates information which comes from the server to the user. However, this is not the case. Every time a user visits a page the web browser transmits information - an IP address, information about the browser (make, model, version number, operating system), and referrer information (what was clicked on to get to the current page). This exchange happens unconsciously and the information provided is often aggregated for commercial marketing purposes.

IP Collage is an attempt to explore this exchange which lies beneath all web content and to use it as the basis for a productive relationship. In exchange for their IP address a user is presented with an image they may save to their local drive, print and/or exhibit.

IP Collage is also an attempt to break participation from interactivity. The piece is participative in the sense that the user directs the aesthetic of the piece, yet it manifests as a static PNG image; it is only interactive in as much as the browser provides interactivity - as it does to all images (much in the same way most video is only as interactive as a VCR.. & further establishing the dominant aesthetic of interactivity as navigation).

I have compiled a video archaeology of this piece, compressing the first year of its activity into one hour. Each frame of video represents roughly 4 minutes 33 seconds (a synchronistic testament to John Cage) of time between May 13 02002 and may 13 02003. It is currently in DVD and mpeg-4 formats, and I'm still trying to decide how to make it available as I am somewhat ambivalent about transforming a participative piece into a static video record. Feel free to get in touch if you'd like to see it. source code, as usual, is also available upon request.

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Links for 2006-05-18 [del.icio.us]

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Matchbox 2005 and Judas

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lighttank1.jpg lighttank2.jpg

Stanislav Vajce is currently showing two of his amazing robotic pieces as part of the informARTics-exhibition at ZKM Karlsruhe. The first one, "Matchbox 2005" is a very reduced and tiny light tank, which in fact is an autonomous vehicle that will continously explore a mock-up battlefield. It's got a lifesize puppet of the artist sitting in the hatch, too. For Vajce, light tanks are the technical achievement where great mobility meets maximal destruction and disruption of the social fabrics they come across.

The second piece works a play on military technologies as well: "Judas" comes with the slogan "Digital is better" (Tocotronic?) and is a six-legged robot stuffed into a cute blue jumpsuit. It as well will roam its surroundings, but what looks like a head is an array of sensors which enables it to recognize patterns, letters and allegedly even read. It looks cute in its "dogishness" (Vajce) but actually it's a "little snitch" that will eventually "send an army of light tanks" your way.

Don't miss his hilarious website Maschinismus.

Related: Tom Sachs' Island.

MORE »

Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome