Posts for October 2006

brian eno music paintings

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brianeno.jpg
a collection of computer-generated art works that combines & layers Brian Eno's hand-made slides based on parameters from his ambient music. the program can generate 77 million different artworks automatically. Eno said: "I think of these things as visual music ... intended to occupy television downtime so that, instead of having a dead hole in the wall, you have a living picture."

[links: allsaintsrecords.com & sean.co.uk & amazon.com]

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Originally posted on information aesthetics by Rhizome


Douglas Irving Repetto

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Douglas Irving Repetto is an artist and teacher. His work, including sculpture, installation, performance, recordings, and software is presented internationally. He is the founder of a number of art/community-oriented groups including dorkbot: people doing strange things with electricity, ArtBots: The Robot Talent Show, organism: making art with living systems, and the music-dsp mailing list and website. Douglas is Director of Research at the Columbia University Computer Music Center. Here are a selection of his own projects that I especially like.

[...]

Slowscan Soundwave is a series of pieces that attempt to create simple physical manifestations of complex physical, biological, and social phenomena. Sound travels through open spaces via the compression and rarefaction (expansion) of air molecules. For example, as the head of a drum vibrates, it pushes and pulls at the air around it. That pushing and pulling creates areas of higher and lower air pressure, which propagate out from the source in waves.

Slowscan Soundwave 1 uses a microphone to sample the ambient air pressure in its environment. It then uses those samples to change the alignment of seventy nine suspended plastic sheets in an attempt to create a visible analog to those constantly changing pressure fronts. Even the simplest of sounds is too complex, and changes too quickly, to be accurately represented by plastic sheets slowly moving this way and that. As a result the patterns formed by Slowscan Soundwave are a crude approximation of those formed in the air. [....]

This is roughly analogous to what happens when you blow, clap, or otherwise introduce a sudden burst of energy into the air. Your action displaces air molecules, causing them in turn to displace their neighboring molecules. This action reverberates though the air, transmitting the energy from your action to distant parts of the space. puff bang reverb is ...

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Click-through for much more info on other projects, including Slowscan 2 & 3...

Originally posted on Interactive Architecture dot Org by Rhizome


brian eno music paintings

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brianeno.jpg

a collection of computer-generated art works that combines & layers Brian Eno's hand-made slides based on parameters from his ambient music. the program can generate 77 million different artworks automatically. Eno said: "I think of these things as visual music ... intended to occupy television downtime so that, instead of having a dead hole in the wall, you have a living picture."

[links: allsaintsrecords.com & sean.co.uk & amazon.com]

MORE »

Originally posted on information aesthetics by Rhizome


ARCO/BEEP New Media Art Awards

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Call for submissions

ARCO/BEEP NEW MEDIA ART AWARDS
2nd edition
Conceded by BEEP, in collaboration with ARCO
Worth 8.000 euros and 6.000 euros

The goal of these awards is to advance the production and exhibition of New Media Art, and art linked to new technologies. Its purpose is to promote new high-tech art, and to foster communication between the manufacturers/creators of this new technology and those who create art. A natural collaboration, which will benefit and enrich both sides.

There are two ACQUISITION PRIZES:

1) @ARCO Prize: worth 8.000 euros. To be eligible, an artwork must be shown by a gallery at the 26th edition of ARCO, the International Contemporary Art Fair, in Madrid (15-19 February 2007), and must have a significant component involving new technology or electronic media.

2) OFF-ARCO Prize: worth 6.000 euros. Artworks presented by individual artists or collectives.

The prizes will be awarded by an international jury of prestigious specialists.
Registration form will be available from the 30th of October on the ARCO/BEEP NEW MEDIA ART Prize website http://www.arco.beep.es

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Originally posted on networked_performance by luis


Luke Jerram receives Clark Bursary

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Reflector

The 6th UK Digital Art Award of £17,500 is the largest to date and will enable Luke to develop his career and proposed ideas through a supported residency at Watershed, a leading public media centre in Bristol.

Luke will document, present and discuss his work in progress, online and through events and exhibition, to engage audiences throughout the development process. With additional input from key partners such as Situations, a research and commissioning programme at the University of the West of England, Luke will benefit from a responsive network of support and facilitation.

Over 70 applications were made to the Bursary and following shortlisting and interviews Luke was selected. An expert panel participated in the selection process including ARC Co-directors Chris Byrne and Iliyana Nedkova; Helen Cole, Producer of Live Art and Dance at Arnolfini, Bristol; and Anthony Rowe, artist and previous recipient of the Clark Bursary.

The Bursary is funded by J A Clark Charitable Trust, Watershed, and Arts Council England South West. In association with the University of the West of England, Bristol.

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Originally posted on Art Research Communication by chris


Paul B Davis on Nintendo Hacking

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YouTube: "Produced by Hit 'n' Run... this interview took place with Paul B. Davis from the BEIGE collective at the 35th Int'l Film Festival Rotterdam. Paul exhibited a piece at the exhibition 'Satellite of Love' produced by Exploding Television. Here he talks about his Nintendo Cartridge Hacking."

Davis' delivery is very dry and funny in this video, and he has some great things to say. He and fellow artist Cory Arcangel, through their work with the BEIGE collective, have both been active proponents of busting open game cartridges and reprogramming the chips (though perhaps in a less aggressively activist way today than a few years ago--but that's another post). While gaygamer.net calls Mary Flanagan the "secret heart" of the movie 8 BIT, I don't really agree with that. (As mentioned earlier, Kristin Lucas's work would have been a catchier example in the film to show the psychological effects of life in a high-speed technological world--her late '90s videos incorporating game and sci-fi tropes are at once disturbing, aesthetically engaging, "lo fi," and presaged many themes of what might now be called the 8 BIT movement.)

No, if the movie has a secret heart, it's why Arcangel and Davis, who used the phrase "8 Bit" in an LP title five years ago and are sort of the poster children for the current scene, started hacking Nintendo cartridges in the first place. Davis was always the more political of the pair in how he speaks about it, but he makes an interesting point in this YouTube vid: that untapped aesthetic potential exists in everyday gear that is meant to be inaccessible to us. As he describes it, the "cheapest, highest quality audio and video generation system you could get" is locked up in a proprietary system ...

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Originally posted on Tom Moody by tom moody


The Art-O-Meter

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This doesn't need any comment from me:

"Art-O-Meter is a device that measures the quality of an art piece. It bases its evaluation on the amount of time that people spend in front of an artwork compared to the total time of exhibition. The measurements are graphically represented by comments and a 5 star rating system.

0mupper.jpg 0arrtopmet.jpg

Without the interaction of a viewer, the Art-O-Meter will register time like a regular clock. However, when a user enters the area covered by its motion sensor, a second timer is triggered and it will count time as the viewer observes the artwork."

Video.

A work by Marcelo Coelho.
Merci Cati!

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Sounds About Listening

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San Francisco's Exploratorium has long been a model of public institutions supporting artists. Housed in the Palace of Fine Arts, built for the World's Fair in the early 1900s, this museum and learning center is an expansive site for the exhibition of educational installations related to scientific processes. The hands-on projects attract kids, while people of all generations are drawn to the large-scale art installations created by an international panoply of new media artists. Over the years, through residencies, exhibitions, and other public programs, the Exploratorium has acquired a respectable sound archive, ranging from more didactic to more creative pieces. They recently initiated the project, 'Listen: Making Sense of Sound,' which is a collection of sound art works by artists Ali Momeni, Nigel Helyer, and Michelle Nagai. All of the recordings are available online, but visitors to the Exploratorium can also listen to site-specific recordings related to the fifty-five interactive exhibits on view in their 5000-square-foot space. These pieces use sound to explore the nature of sound, including recording techniques, methods of transmission, and the processes through which we hear. Get in line, or online, to have a listen. - Angelo Moreno

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Sounds About Listening

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San Francisco's Exploratorium has long been a model of public institutions supporting artists. Housed in the Palace of Fine Arts, built for the World's Fair in the early 1900s, this museum and learning center is an expansive site for the exhibition of educational installations related to scientific processes. The hands-on projects attract kids, while people of all generations are drawn to the large-scale art installations created by an international panoply of new media artists. Over the years, through residencies, exhibitions, and other public programs, the Exploratorium has acquired a respectable sound archive, ranging from more didactic to more creative pieces. They recently initiated the project, 'Listen: Making Sense of Sound,' which is a collection of sound art works by artists Ali Momeni, Nigel Helyer, and Michelle Nagai. All of the recordings are available online, but visitors to the Exploratorium can also listen to site-specific recordings related to the fifty-five interactive exhibits on view in their 5000-square-foot space. These pieces use sound to explore the nature of sound, including recording techniques, methods of transmission, and the processes through which we hear. Get in line, or online, to have a listen. - Angelo Moreno

http://www.exploratorium.edu/listen

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org: Rhizome News by Rhizome


PAPER RAD FASHION SHOW

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Paper Rad and Paul Davis made a fashion show!

Originally posted on YouTube :: Videos by lektrogirl by Rhizome