Posts for August 2007

Fiction Envisaging Reality

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New York-based Canadian artist Nancy Davenport has been exploring photography's medium-specificity through a series of computer-manipulated photos that challenge the illusion of the real embedded within the photographic document. In 2001, for example, her exhibition 'The Apartments,' presented at New York's Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery one week before 9/11, stormed the international art scene, as it included a group of pictures of fictionalized bomb attacks on modernist architectural edifices, and thus prompted the uncanny feeling that fiction was envisaging reality. Currently, Davenport is completing her latest project, 'Workers,' that is on the checklist of the upcoming Istanbul Biennial. Evoking the famous early film in the history of cinema, the Lumiere Brothers's 1895 'Workers Leaving the Lumiere Factory,' Davenport's installation consists of a multi-screen DVD environment depicting a factory and portraits of sets of both Norwegian blue-collar workers and their out-sourced Chinese counterparts. Referencing nineteenth-century technology yet using more recent image-making techniques, Davenport thus examines the politics of representation within contemporary digital culture. Selecting as her subject matter the global economy, with its never-ending flux of capital, goods, and labor, the artist’s output hits a higher tone, as it reflects a facet of everyday life that often defines our age. - Miguel Amado

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New Issue of Journal of Aesthetics & Protest

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JOAAP #15 Cover

Intro

From the editors at JOAAP:

Issue #5 of the Journal of Aesthetics & Protest
now available!!!

Contents

1. Issue #5 release! On Speech and talking
2. Upcoming Atlas of Radical Cartography- Journal Press book

Our fifth print issue is a 122 page book edited by Cara Baldwin, Marc Herbst and Christina Ulke. It was designed by Jessica Fleischmann and contains a section of color photos!

From the forward:

'Arguably, today the act of social networking is commodified more visibly and materially than ever before... This commodification shoudn't hinder us to work in relationship to one another and in a social and political context. Social memory with a sense of history and political demands seems to have undergone an accelerated and profound erasure. This rapid memory loss is facilitated by media consolidation and the plundering of public education programs to fund global mercenary actions.'

With this issue, we look at how cultural production (in art, music, speech, writing, interventions, video, and everyday life) attempt to create culturally based alternatives to oppression and war. Within the context of community and grassroots movements creating meaning for their participants and for broader society, again The Journal looks for ways to create counter-narratives and progressive social movements from the bottom up. From the bottom up- often meaning from a position of people having to do-it-themselves (outside traditional governmental or cultural institutions). This act involves trying to remember shared history, discuss potentially shared values, perform immediately shared ideals, and publicly debate or interrupt suspect truths, and on how it is to be together.

This issue is a collection of transcripts, performance transcripts, speeches, analytical essays, campaign critiques, interviews, email conversations and projects. We are not only presenting critical theory, we are also present to you documents and voices for you to critically investigate.

To order ...

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Originally posted on Art Threat by Ezra Winton


Upgrade! New York: eteam's Dislocated Memories

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Thursday, August 30, 2007 at 7pm, Free at Eyebeam, 540 w 21st street, NYC

Please join us and the eteam (Franziska Lamprecht and Hajoe Moderegger) for Upgrade! New York's August event. eteam will discuss the construction of alternate realities via audience participation (intentional or unintentional) within their various projects. In addition, a special guest and a performance/game will set the scene for vibrant dialogue.

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Originally posted on microRevolt reBlog by Rhizome


[Jaygo Bloom]

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'Acorn Electronics' by Jaygo Bloom.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


Susan Philipsz in Skulptur Projekte [Munster]

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This summer, the inhabitants of Munster, Germany and a stream of international visitors are traversing the city’s parks and cobblestone walkways in search of sculpture. Inaugurated in 1977 and recurring every ten years, Skulptur Projekte brings a series of outdoor sculptural interventions to this charmingly modest German town. For this fourth iteration, curators Kasper Konig, Brigitte Franzen, and Carina Plath have invited 36 international -- but primarily Western European -- artists to install site-specific works that reflect or disrupt life in Munster.

Scotland’s Susan Philipsz employs a bridge’s smooth, shaded underside to amplify and echo The Lost Reflection (Das verlorene Spiegelbild), one of the exhibition’s few audio pieces.

In her work, Philipsz sings 'Lovely night, oh night of love, smile upon our joys!,' the barcarole from Jaques Offenbach's The Tales of Hoffmann. The score is based on The Story of the Lost Reflection by the German romantic writer E.T.A. Hoffmann. It is the story of the seductive yet unfortunately vicious charm of the courtesan Giulietta, whose spell men cannot resist, thereby losing their own reflection, so that neither their wives nor their children are able to recognize them.

The story is set in Venice, and when Susan Philipsz's amplified voice resounds under the Torminbrucke across Lake Aa and back again, it reflects the lagoon city with its many canals. The human voice is unable to change the space it fills, but it completely alters the experience of that space. Standing under the Torminbrucke at Lake Aa, you are swept away to the balcony of a palace on the Canale Grande as you listen to Giulietta and Niklaus intone: 'Time flies by, and carries away our tender caresses for ever! Time flies far from this happy oasis and does not return.' Susan Philipsz sings both ...

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Originally posted on Networked Music Review by helen


Time Slips Off the Net

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Kevin Bewersdorf and Paul Slocum draw on the tragicomic nature of internet culture in their current exhibition, 'Passing Time and the Changing Seasons of Time,' at Austin, Texas gallery Okay Mountain. Both artists share an individual appreciation for music and homebrew instruments, and their hacker aesthetic often leads to other forms of shape-shifting--from websites to videos to multi-part installations. But the current show looks at a different form of change: the seasonal. The word seems to be employed here not only in reference to the weather, but perhaps more so in the way that one refers to 'television seasons.' Their solo and collaborative works investigate the emotional arcs, demographics, and formal qualities peculiar to various epochs of visual production. Some of their more interesting works, in this show, attempt to translate between genres, hand-painting the image of a spam message into a sweatshirt or using computer-knitting programs to embed the image of a fictitious pharmaceutical ad (for a product called 'MaxXimuM SorRoW') into a tapestry. Exploring the mainstream life of the digital image, the artists employed the drugstore Walgreens' online photo service to order the fabrication of mugs, coasters, mouse pads, and silkscreened pillows that display the images retrieved in Google searches. These objects and many others are on display at Okay Mountain through September 1st. - Marisa Olson

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Remix Your Blogroll

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Is your blogroll getting stale? Do you need to pump some bass into your RSS feeds? You might consider adding Remix Theory, a relatively new blog maintained by media artist, writer, and curator Eduardo Navas. While Navas has written on the contemporary climate in essays such as 'Regressive and Reflexive Mashups in Sampling Culture,' he makes a distinction between remix culture, and remix proper, and focuses directly on the latter creative act. This inquiry has been addressed by the prolific critic in a number of projects, including his essay on The Blogger as Producer; his curatorial project, The Latency of the Moving Image in New Media, at Los Angeles' Telic Art Space; and his recent interview with Yto (Isabel Eranda) in the Chilean magazine, Escaner Cultural. Remix Theory aggregates Navas's work, alongside excerpts and projects from others. In addition to coverage of various manifestations of the principles of remix, one essential goal of the blog is to define the term, itself. Navas insists that this effort must begin with the study of remixed music, before branching out. Offering copious historical and bibliographic resources to that effect, the site is stimulating on several levels, offering insight into new art works and new means of discussing them. - Elizabeth Johnston

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cube guru

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Originally posted on javier's drawing and poetry corner by javier


stuttering

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[....] Stuttering (also below), or watch a video with voiceover of me telling what it’s all about….

The artist's description:

stuttering is a full-body interactive environment that uses an awkward interface, which asks participants to stutter with their bodies. A piece with too many trigger points, viewers must listen and interact carefully, even cautiously, between intention and passivity. They move in ways they normally wouldn't, and see communication and embodiment as difficult and non-transparent.

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Originally posted on nathaniel and the non-aggressive by Rhizome


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Click -through to see this work by Loshadka's Ilia Ovechkin

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Originally posted on Blogosphere by ilia