Posts for July 2007

FACT revisits ground-breaking Video Positive Festival

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FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology) unveils a new online archive giving public access to over 20 years of technological innovation to coincide with an exhibition re-visiting the organisation’s ground-breaking visual arts festival, Video Positive.

Running bi-annually between 1989 and 2000, The Video Positive Festival brought video art onto the national stage, giving its artists international recognition. The festival reflected FACT’s ethos and long-standing commitment to new work and pioneering art forms and exhibiting commissioned work across a variety of venues across Liverpool. Emerging from the festival came FACT’s Collaborations Programme, now in its 15th year and one of the first arts projects in the UK to be socially engaging and bring artists into the community.

Re: [Video Positive] Archiving Video Positively, will re-stage work by some of the most significant and internationally renowned artists of the festival: David Hall, Judith Goddard, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Imogen Stidworthy and Lei Cox. A new commission by artists Thomson & Craighead will also be on view.

At the same time as the exhibition, the FACT Archive launches, making over 2,000 works by over 100 artists freely available online. Predicted to be one of the largest online archives of digital art, the FACT Archive will include artists working across a variety of disciplines including painting, sculpture, installation, video and performance. Its aim it not only to encourage the enjoyment and perusal of new media and digital art but also to help preserve it by transferring it to a sustainable format.

The exhibition, and archive, is an opportunity for new media and digital artwork to be re-contextualised, examining the rapid development of technology. How do you re-present a work originally conceived in analogue when the current norm is projected in HD? As the audience becomes acquainted with new technology, so too ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Rhizome


The Old Switcharoo

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As the use of digital technologies in contemporary art practice becomes more prevalent, the urge to consider the shared vocabulary of the new media field and the broader culture becomes stronger. This desire appears to be among the driving forces in the conception of Code Switching, an upcoming group exhibition at the Red House Gallery in Venice, California. The show is organized by Quorum--a San Francisco-based collective of artists, curators, critics, and art dealers whose mission is to contribute to the region's intellectual community. It includes work by Bay Area artists Susannah Bettag, Jordan Essoe, Rodney Ewing, Raymond Haywood, Andy Diaz Hope, Andrew Junge, Trek Kelly, Tania Ketenjian, Paul Madonna, Michele Pred, Laurel Roth, Douglas Schneider, and Harry Siter and is organized by Quorum members Raman Frey and Svea Lin Vezzone. The curatorial statement notes that 'Linguists define code-switching as an alternation between two or more languages within a single conversation between people who have one or more language in common.' The question begged here, of course, is of what constitutes a language. While some universities have actually begun looking at computer languages as equivalent, in some ways, to 'natural languages,' there is also a reference here to the social codes that determin behavioral protocols. 'Often an unconscious act, code-switching is used for many purposes, including protection, identification, recognition, approval, and control,' say the organizers. Their argument for these digital and cultural overlaps is compelling and the work appears to be, as well. Code Switching will be on view August 2-September 16. - Irene Wu

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DataPainting

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le catalogue: The catalogue contains representations of objects and installations realized between 1990 and 1996. These representations are gradually deteriorated by the users of the catalogue. The single fact of consulting a catalogue’s page adds a double stripe in the form of a cross. The combination of the observation’s time and the observer’s point of view modifies the observed object and transforms it gradually into an abstracted image. Observed objects become sets of observers marks.

le catalogue is part of Yann Le Guennec’s DATAPAINTING.COM: “Painting with data, data as input, pictures as output. Each picture is a dynamic composition which results from a program activated by a user. In programs, some parameters vary randomly or according to data suitable for the moment and the socio-technical context in which the picture generation takes place. Each picture is thus a representation in the field of possibles ones created by the code and the spectator. Each image is then an element of infinite and disordered series.

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Robotic Guitars, Lyrics as Art Installation

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Saadane Afif Power Chords installation

A beautiful art installation; pray they’re not programmed to play Stairway to Heaven. Saadane Afif's Power Chords, view of the installation at the Lyon Biennial 2005. Image by Galerie Michel Rein.

Maybe it’s something about music making in the digital age, the alienation of music technology. Or maybe there’s just something fun about mechanical objects making sound on their own. Whatever it is, artists lately have been fascinated by mechanical instruments. Here’s yet another one:

French artist Saadane Afif makes sometimes-chilly installations out of musical objects, like a minimalist collection of guitars and amps, strummed by mechanical apparatus, in his piece Power Chords. Or, in art world-speak, he…

…works with notions of displacement and contrast. His pieces, vibrating with multiple meanings, function by using collusion as their driving force. He employs objects, scale models, installations, sounds, and writing to classify the unclassifiable and mirror-in the work of art itself - the dialog that arises between the viewer and the artist. This dialog is continuously fueled by various allusions and is infiltrated on every side by historic, psychological, social, and cultural elements.

[More....]

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Originally posted on createdigitalmusic.com by Peter Kirn


Rhizome integrates Creative Commons licenses into ArtBase

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Rhizome is proud to announce its integration of Creative Commons licenses into its online archive of art, the Artbase. As of today, artists have the option to license their work under Creative Commons Licenses. This suite of licenses allows creators to shift the terms of copyright from "All Rights Reserved" to "Some Rights Reserved," therefore enabling authors, scientists, educators and artists, amongst others, to mark their creative works with the cultural freedoms they abide by. Rhizome's hope is that through the use of these licenses, artists will have greater access to each others' work in furtherance of their goals.

Rhizome would like to thank Wendy Seltzer, Fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School, for her guidance and Fred Benenson, Creative Commons Cultural Fellow and student at New York University's Interactive Telecommunications Program, for his coordination of the project. "By implementing Creative Commons, Rhizome aligns itself with sites like Blip.tv, Flickr and Digg, who nurture not only a community of free creativity, but of free culture," says Benenson. Lauren Cornell, Executive Director of Rhizome, adds that "It's in the spirit of Rhizome to foster collaboration amongst artists. I'm happy that Rhizome is able to make these licenses available, and to support the practice of sharing cultural material within the arts."

About Rhizome
Rhizome is an online platform for the global new media art community. Our programs support the creation, presentation, discussion and preservation of contemporary art that uses new technologies in significant ways.
http://www.rhizome.org

About Creative Commons
Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain. Creative Commons licences provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists, and ...

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Ed. Note: Pictured is MTAA's Creative Commons Diagram.

Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Rhizome


A Profile View of the Museum Visitor

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To refer to surveillance happening on the internet is, in some ways, sadly old hat. We may not be in control of it, but we know it's happening. It is much more challenging to contextualize the surveillance practices of the network era in relationship to profiling, the common telos of spies. An exhibition on view at New York's Whitney Museum of American Art presents two public art installations that chime-in on the subject of identity, privacy, and protection in surveillance culture. Developed shortly after 9/11, David Rokeby's project, Taken, monitors museum visitors in two ways: 'a continuously accumulating history of movements of visitors that is both a statistical plot of gallery activities and a record of each act of each visitor; and a catalog of visitors' head shots with classifying adjectives randomly attributed to them (i.e. unsuspecting, complicit, hungry).' These relatively traditional techniques are put on display by Rokeby, in order to address 'the increasing use of automated systems for profiling people as part of the war on terrorism and was conceived as an attempt to help ask questions about appropriate uses of technology.' In a more recent project (2006-Present), collaborators Amy Alexander, Wojciech Kosma, Vincent Rabaud, Jesse Gilbert, and Nikhil Rasiwasia connect entertainment media and surveillance with SVEN, the Surveillance Video Entertainment Network. Here they turn the same technology used to 'recognize' the facial attributes of criminals or terrorists on its head by using it to separate average people from rock stars, in the museum-going crowd. The project not only exposes the questionable methodologies behind such profiling processes, but it also parodies the absurdity of self-surveillance in a culture obsessed with 'reality' tv. These activist works require viewer activation. You can visit them through September 9th. - Marisa Olson

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Joëlle Bitton: “Abstract” + “RAW”

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Abstract is an interactive installation on the theme of waiting and the perception of the time passing-by: inviting visitors in a space where the body and its movement play the role of interfaces. From a point of view on the Japanese garden and its vision on the surrounding, aesthetic and philosophical world, this project is inspired by the tension between elements intentionally thought here in a contradictory dialog: abstraction and texture, concealment and disclosure, empty space and framed space. This installation–at at Gallery EF, Tokyo–places the visitor on the razor’s edge: always on the border, between two worlds, passing from one to the other. This is the experience of difference and of a fragile balance, of what is called in the Japanese culture, the impermanence of things. The latter is then staged in a relationship to the cycle of time, to the emotions that the expectation of something to happen can generate. [via Architectradure]

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RAW: An audio / photographic tool for conveying minimally - mediated impressions of everyday life - Authors: Joelle Bitton, Stefan Agamanolis, Matthew Karau; Research group: Human Connectedness; Research lab: Media Lab Europe; Year: 2002 - 2004; System: Projection, binauraul sound and programmed in ISIS.

RAW is a set of tools and processes for capturing, in an unconventional way, everyday subjective experience of a place, a culture, a people. RAW is named for the raw data gathered that purposefully remain unedited throughout the processes. The combined characteristics of RAW (including an emphasis on context of use, non-edition, and data presentation) make this concept a novel approach to authorship, to cultural exchanges, to audiovisual language, and to documentation. At its core, RAW is an audiovisual recording device that combines a digital camera and audio recorder. Taking a picture triggers the recording of the sound a minute before and a ...

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Data Processing

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Mary Bates Neubauer's work seems to offer proof that, as the old adage goes, one can make numbers say anything. The Arizona-based artist's images draw upon scientific data to take a variety of ambiguous shapes. Neubauer's background is in sculpture and her 3D images reveal this approach, as they are made of layer upon layer of photograms, scanned images, animations, and rapid prototypes that have been processed digitally and combined with basic sculptural molding and reproduction methods. Despite titles like Airport Decibal Levels (pictured), there seems to be no discernible relationship between the image and the information to which it corresponds. The work seeks to comment on the processes used by the scientific community to gather and analyze data. As the artist says, 'It raises questions about how scientific and technical findings are interpreted and what effect this has upon our understanding of the nature of empirical evidence.' The images reveal the creativity of the research process while seeming to suggest a dynamic secret life to statistics. If you're near Southern California between August 9-September 1, you can see for yourself that there's more to data than meets the eye, by visiting Neubauer's exhibit at the Los Angeles Center For Digital Art. - Angela Moreno

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I SHOULD

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Originally posted on NEW RAFAEL BLOG by Rhizome


Robert Henke - Atlantic Waves

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atlantic_waves - Robert Henke

One of the more impressive audio-visual events of last few years, for me, was the Nicolai/Henke/Ikeda gig in the Tate Turbine Hall, London, back in May 2006. All three performers won me over, providing very different interpretations of the audio-visual aesthetic.

Robert Henke performed his Atlantic Waves piece, a custom software application which drives Ableton Live. It�s a graphical mutating score that provides a visual representation of the sound and acts as a kind sequencer to the music itself. A nod in the direction of Mondrian�s grid paintings perhaps, the screen is populated with moving coloured squares that seem to interact like traffic or Cellular Automata, sometime imploding and regrouping in perfect synchronisation with the abstracted beats. The process is fascinating to watch as you have no exact idea what the connection is between the software and music, so you tend to invent connections as way of making sense of this hermetic dashboard.

Atlantic waves is performed with in collaboration with Scott Monteith whose site contains a detailed description of Atlantic Waves:

‘Atlantic Waves is an improvised network music performance by Monolake and Deadbeat. A special application, the Atlantic Waves Interface III, makes it possible to create music together in real-time while being thousands of miles apart. The Atlantic Waves Interface utilises a beautiful graphical surface which is projected during the performance. This interface is simple enough to be controlled in real time but allows for building up complex musical structures. It also allows the audience to follow all actions and to become part of the process. Every sound generated has a visual representation and all interaction with the software is displayed. The result is a unique and constantly evolving and changing piece of audio-visual art, created simultaneously in two different locations ...

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Originally posted on dataisnature.com by Rhizome