Posts for 2012

Final Day of Rhizome's Annual Community Campaign

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Today is the final day of Rhizome's Community Campaign! We are incredibly close to reaching our $25,000 goal. If you have not made your contribution yet, we ask that you please do so now. It takes only a few moments to make a donation but it makes an impact that lasts an entire year.

Throughout our history, Rhizome has brought together a forward-thinking, international community of artists, writers, curators, technologists and new media enthusiasts. Together, we can continue to promote this emerging artistic field!

Donations are essential to the operation of our programs and artist initiatives here at Rhizome. With the support from our community, we are able to bring you more content on the blog, bigger and better programs, and new features on the website.

We have been overwhelmed with the generous support from the nearly 300 individuals who have contributed to the campaign. Please consider taking a moment to join the list of Rhizome supporters today.

 

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Extreme Animals Pictureplane Remix and Video

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Pictureplane "Body Mods" remix by Extreme Animals from Jacob Ciocci.

Support a community of forward-thinking artists, writers, curators and technologist and receive Extreme Animals's limited edition ringtone by making a $25 donation during Rhizome's Community Campaign.

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"Money is His Medium"

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Poems by Erik Stinson

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Erik Stinson, untitled, 2010 

 

go upstream young man: drugs, guns, advertising and the nyc art world 1700-2010

 

i’m seeking a legnthy

ethics-agnostic history of

corporate america from

dutch manhattan to

google silicon valley.

can anyone help me?

time is running out.

i think i’m being

followed, my phones

are tapped and all

i want is an entry

level job

Erik Stinson, Untitled, 2011

 

executive microsystem

three small, harsh

cubes in

concert with

your massive

pulsing

ego circa

1998

 

teen dads let it all hang out

 

we went out

to the salt flats

with a 12 rack

of bud and talked

about new

young starlets

Erik Stinson, Untitled, 2010

 

Anonymous asked: why r u gay

whoa internet literary scene strikes again

‘for the fans’

 

 

 

 

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Letter from the Poetry Editor

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I keep hearing artists say they are writing. What can they do with what they have written? Leave it in the notebook, like a sketch—a trace of a private activity done in the studio. Get it printed in a literary zine and become a hybrid artist/writer. Attach it to the brochure of a gallery exhibition and let it function, like a press release, for the show’s promotional apparatus—an ephemeral accessory to a saleable thing. Make an artist’s book. By joining work with words and work with materials in a tangible object, the artist’s book leads an audience to see the two as equal members in an artist’s output. But what else is there?

The question looks familiar from Rhizome’s perspective. It doubles the one facing artists who work online. With internet art, as with writing, choices about display are wrapped in choices about distribution. At one point or another, many artists wonder whether what they do online is an end in itself or a public sketchbook, a way to work through ideas that will later be embodied in a work to be shown in a gallery. Furthermore, it’s harder to make work online than on a canvas without touching problems of language. The internet may be a medium of visual culture, but the keyword is what finds the image, the tag brings you back to it, chat spreads it. There is plenty of popular-science speculation on how these new everyday forms of language use are “changing our minds.” Until ways are found to measure these changes, art and poetry can tell us more about them than prose.

Today marks the beginning of a project to regularly feature artists’ texts, poetry, and experimental writing on Rhizome’s blog. Posts in the series ...

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Recorded Motion Path of Drum Sticks

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This animated drawing is a recorded motion path of drum sticks in process of performing rhythmic composition. Motion trajectory was captured by Vicon MX system, raw CSV files were translated into visual language in C4D. - odaibe

via Prosthetic Knowledge

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City of Work by Michael Lewy

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City of Work is a project by Michael Lewy including maps, charts, videos, letters, and 3D rendering made with Vue and Google SketchUp. I caught up with Lewy over email to find out more about how this city operates.


 

City of Work appears to be a superfiction of videos and architectural rendering. Could you describe the story behind it?

City of Work is a dystopian society. Work is all encompassing, vacation is chosen by lottery and each individual is tested at the HUMAN POTENTIAL INSTITUTE.  I wanted to create a work that would use a lot of different media to discuss the ideas of success and failure. Along with the video I have also created blueprints, advertising, PowerPoint charts, social media, websites and architectural renderings.


The project seems inspired by corporate management training videos and human resources handbooks. Did you do any research outside of your own office experiences?

The Prelinger Archives, is a great resource for industrial films form the 40’s and 50’s – I look at those a lot. I also look at a lot of architecture from the 1970’s, I have a fondness for the Brutalism period and Russian architecture.

How does one escape the City of Work?

It is gated city but I don’t think of it as a prison. People end there by choice. So I guess you would escape by moving away.


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RECOMMENDED READING: Hakim Bey: Repopulating the Temporary Autonomous Zone by Simon Sellars

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The TAZ may have remained a fringe work if it wasn’t for “cyberculture,” which proved among the more resilient memes in alternative art and culture from the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s. The original electronic networks that became the prototype for today’s commercial Internet were developed in the 1980s, a development of the first interconnected computer channels produced in the 1960s for US military purposes. As François Cusset summarizes: “These networks embodied, for some, a space for resistance, a social dead zone, a territory that was still imperceptible, in whose shelter they could build a new community and undermine the ruling powers … the first groups of hackers emerged [forming] in Bruce Sterling’s words, a veritable ‘digital underground’.” In cyberculture’s incandescent popcult moment, the gritty noir futures of cyberpunk science fiction, built upon the template forged by the ascending reputations of novelists William Gibson and Sterling, and extrapolated from present-day technological developments, were cited as metaphoric portrayals of a real world in thrall to the nascent Internet and to the implications for mediated life it held. Cyberphile magazines like Mondo 2000 (and later, Wired and 21C) spliced cyberpunk attitude with digital culture’s bleeding edge, carrying advertisements for dialup modems, CD ROMs and pixel-art software in between articles and interviews exploring every facet of cyberculture: From body modification to the emergent politics of the net, from new strains of cyberpunk fiction and rave music to the “bumper sticker libertarianism” leaking from cyberculture’s startling new cachet.

Fermented within this heady “frontier” atmosphere, manifestos were abundant. John Perry Barlow of the Electronic Frontier Foundation drew up a Declaration for the Independence of Cyberspace, demanding that the net – “the new home of Mind” – be forever self-governing, forever free from corporate and governmental restriction. Douglas Rushkoff produced a book-length vérité document ...

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Phenakistoscope, Hypnoscope, Centograph, Animatoscope, Chronophotographoscope, Variscope, Criterioscope, Vitropticon, Vivrescope, Xograph...

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Matthew Battles at Hilobrow uncovers this 1898 New York Times piece listing and considering potential emerging moving image technologies:

Battles comments, "It’s a vibrant bestiary of images, actions, and ideals: time, light, vitality, movement, judgment, change, vision, epiphany, and the animal world. Although the writer of this piece talks about a single machine, these weren’t all names for the same thing; moving pictures emerged in a radiant bouquet of formats, modes of presentation, and proprietary media. The names are evocative of another time—and taken together, they express a condition familiar to us all."

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Alexei Shulgin and Aristarkh Chernyshev (Electroboutique) at London Science Museum

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Images from Alexei Shulgin and Aristarkh Chernyshev (Electroboutique) pop-up at the Science Museum. On display 23 Nov 2011 - 14 Feb 2012

 

 

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