Posts for June 2013

Performance GIFs 8: Marisa Olson

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The latest in an ongoing series of performance GIFs curated by Jesse Darling.

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#Resistance as Daily Practice

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In the aftermath of a tumultuous weekend in Istanbul, artist Merve Unsal reflects on the relationship between social media and the quotidian practice of protest.

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The Week Ahead: Our Data, Ourselves Edition

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Promotional video for Lovid, U R QR (2013).

This weekend, artist duo Lovid will premiere a new project titled U R QR. If you participate, various things will happen to you, including your face being painted in black and white blocks and then photographed; when combined, the resulting images will combine to form a functioning QR code. QR codes have been waiting for a really good art project to come along for a long time, and this could be their big moment.

 

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A Queer History of Computing, Part Five: Messages from the Unseen World

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This marks the fifth and final installment in a genealogy of queer computing (Part OnePart TwoPart Three and Part Four). 

Note from Alan Turing to Robin Gandy, March 1954.

Born in London in 1949, Andrew Hodges attended Cambridge University from 1967 to 1971, where he trained as a mathematician. While there, he encountered the work of Alan Turing for the first time, learning of his significant contributions to the history of mathematical logic—though not of his homosexuality.

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Site Sprint

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The Rhizome team are holed up in Red Hook for the rest of the week, doing some much-needed spring cleaning on the beast that is rhizome.org. If we happen to break anything, please don't be alarmed, but do email us if you find any bugs: admin{at}rhizome dot org.

Image: Scott Meisburger, Screenshot of interface for committing changes to Rhizome.org. Created using CSS Button Generator. 2013.

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Questioning the World as Image: The 55th Venice Biennale and "The Whole Earth"

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Photo of Earth by the crew of Apollo 8. December 22, 1968

The central theme for this year’s Venice Biennale exhibition, curated by Massimiliano Gioni, comes from an obscure patented design for an encyclopedic palace by the self-taught Italian-American artist Marino Auriti. Envisioned as a 136-story building that would take over sixteen blocks of Washington, D.C., Auriti’s palace was to house all the available knowledge in the world. Titling the show "Il Palazzo Enciclopedico" after Auriti’s unrealized model, Gioni and his team selected an eclectic group of artists, psychologists, mystics and more whose work resonates with Auriti’s desire to create a total image of the world. In many ways, the exhibition can be seen as a response to the exhaustive overabundance of information available on the internet. As Gioni pointedly asks in his essay, "…what is the point of creating an image of the world when the world itself has become increasingly like an image?"

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Comments on Wark

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Several critical comments on our recent posts about McKenzie Wark and on Marc Garrett's announcement for a talk by Wark at Furtherfield were caught in spam filtration for a time, and have now been retrieved and published. 

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Cory Arcangel, "GAO" (2013)

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Cory Arcangel, "Clinton," 2011. Pencil on paper (produced with Mutoh XP-300 series printer), edition 1 of 3, 11 x 8.5 inches. 

Last year, critic Alix Rule and artist David Levine suggested in a much-discussed article in Triple Canopy that the dense, quasi-theoretical writing found in contemporary art press releases should be reformatted as meter and appreciated as avant-garde poetry. This week, Cory Arcangel took the next logical step and used the email press release for his forthcoming exhibition at DHC/ART, which was circulated on the e-flux mailing list, as an opportunity for a sly text-based intervention.

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Chariots of the Gods: A spaceship lands in Bogotá

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Eduardo Ramírez Villamizar, Nave Especial (1979). Photographed in 1990.

The morning of April 17, 1980 dawned cold, gray and damp in Bogotá. In other words, it was like most mornings there, with a low leaden sky and the dark cordillera of the Andes looming like a wall over the bleak altiplano and moorlands. It was just like any other autumn morning in Colombia's capital, except for two things: one was the depressingly familiar month-old hostage crisis at the Dominican Embassy; the other was the spaceship.

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The Week Ahead: We're in the MON3Y Edition

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Selected events, exhibitions and deadlines this week, culled from Rhizome Announce. 

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