1 Question Interview with Hanne Mugaas

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Takeshi Murata's Melter 2 at Gosen Skole from "Keep On Moving, Don't Stop"

I tracked down curator Hanne Mugaas, one of the organizers behind New York's Art Since the Summer of '69, for a 1 question interview, à la Rafaël Rozendaal's One Question Interview blog. Mugaas is the first to curate a new public video art initiative in Stavanger, Norway called Public Screens. In the spirit of Boston's Lumen Eclipse or Creative Time's At 44 1/2, Public Screens presents video art around the city on large public screens. Mugaas's exhibition for this new project "Keep On Moving, Don’t Stop" brings together animations by a young generation of artists who grew up under the specter of the internet, television and video games. Artists include Michael Bell-Smith, Vidya Gastaldon, Ezra Johnson, Yui Kugimiya, Takeshi Murata, Adam Shecter, and Espen Friberg. (More shots of the exhibit after the jump.) Given the topic of the show, I thought it would be fitting to ask Hanne about her childhood exposure to animation.

What was your favorite animated television show as a child and why?

My favorite animation as a kid was Flåklypa Grand Prix (Pinchcliffe Grand Prix) from 1975. It was made by the legendary Norwegian animator Ivo Caprino. It's about the inventor Reodor Felgen who's living with his animal friends Ludvig, a nervous, pessimistic and melancholic hedgehog, and Solan, a cheerful and optimistic magpie. One day, the trio discover that one of Reodor's former assistants, Rudolf Blodstrupmoen, has stolen his design for a race car engine and has become a world champion Formula One driver. Solan secures funding from an Arab oil sheik who happens to be vacationing in Flåklypa, and to enter the race, the trio builds a gigantic racing car ...

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Slot Machine (2010) - Jan Robert Leegte

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It all started when, on a trip to Germany, I was resting at the hotel bar. My glare was fixed on a slot machine endlessly running its attract mode. Snapping out of the (meanwhile) mesmerised state I was in, I wondered if I could isolate this obscure animation as a work. Back home, I obtained a machine and stripped it of its information (the glass plates, the reels, stickers, sounds, etc). The work basically is a tribute to the unknown programmer. The obscure unknown artist responsible for all the animations, start up modes, test modes, etc. of all the electronic hard- and software out there in the world. It is a found footage work, footage hidden in the interface of an ordinary nameless gambling machine.

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On Nathaniel Stern & Jessica Meuninck-Ganger's "Passing Between" at AOP Gallery

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Nathaniel Stern and Jessica Meuninck-Ganger, The Gallerist, 2009

This past month, Johannesburg’s AOP Gallery, a space devoted to works on paper, hosted the exhibition “Passing Between” which showcased the collaborative output between digital artist Nathaniel Stern and printmaker Jessica Meuninck-Ganger. At the outset, Stern and Meuninck-Ganger approached the collaboration as a chance to learn each other's techniques. But they quickly chose to focus on their own strengths in a process they call, "passing between", hence the title of the exhibition. For Stern, the move toward printmaking comes from a long interest in the technique. In recent work, he has engaged with an expanded form of digital print making, using a hacked portable scanner to produce densely patterned sequences of natural images, in a project called Compressionism. For “Passing Between,” Stern concentrated on using digital photo frames as a medium for displaying loops of video obtained through live filming, and sampled machinima taken from Second Life. Meuninck-Ganger responded to the framed video loops with an encyclopedic range of printmaking techniques from wood block to mono print, silkscreen, etching, and photogravure. In some cases, she printed or etched directly on the screens of the digital photo frames; in other cases, the prints were layered over the screens creating a delicate conjunction between the fibers of the paper medium and the illumination of the underlying video. In The Gallerist, a prominent New York art dealer is portrayed anxiously perched on a chair in middle of a lithograph while below the surface of the paper machinima sharks circle him endlessly.

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Nathaniel Stern and Jessica Meuninck-Ganger, Twin Cities, 2009

The effect is both magical and subtle. Jessica's images often capture a static moment from the subject matter of the video in etching or ink. The pleasure offered by the composite images comes ...

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Best... Flame War... Ever.... (2007) - Eddo Stern

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Woods of Arcady (.com) (2010) - Jon Rafman

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Interview with Sinan Ascioglu

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"Driving through Iceland” sketch by dotlassie. Winner of Rhizome's Tiny Sketch Competition.

OpenProcessing.org is a site that has built a community around sharing visual coding examples created in Processing. As user number 36, I had the unique privilege of watching the idea take shape, while in a thesis group with Sinan at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program. During it’s first two years of activity, the site has grown to host thousands of user-generated sketches and subsequent conversations between artists / programmers, teachers, and students from around the world. Sinan and I escaped the snow recently at a café outside Washington Square Park to discuss OpenProcessing’s origins, Rhizome’s collaboration with OpenProcessing in the Tiny Sketch competition, and what we can expect for the future. - Tim Stutts

Tim: How did you first come up with the idea for OpenProcessing?

Sinan: I guess the first thing to talk about is OpenVisuals, which was my Master’s thesis project at ITP (Interactive Telecommunications Program, New York University). I was reading Edward Tufte’s books at the time, and I became very interested in data visualization. In the meantime I was also fascinated with the social revolution that was happening on the web, through a class I was taking at NYU with professor Clay Shirky. Before studying with Clay, I didn’t understand Facebook—I didn’t even have a Facebook account. I knew I was missing some concepts, and wanted to understand what was going on. Through his classes, I decided that my thesis would have a social component. I also discovered ManyEyes, a site where users can upload datasets, and choose between different the visualization methods for augmentation. Users comment on each other’s visualizations, and may even suggest other ways of looking at or representing the dataset. What ...

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ThingPit (2009) - Taras Hrabowsky

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Tales of the Unexpected (2008) - Carl Burgess

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Faceted Sphere on An Escalator (2008) - Michael Bell-Smith

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Crystal World (2009) - Tara Sinn

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