Passengers (2010-Ongoing) - Riley Harmon

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Originally via we make money not art

Thanks to Riley Harmon for the screengrabs

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Dirty Water Creamaster Caraoke (2011) - C&C Karaoke Factory

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My Way (2009) - Amie Siegel

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Treating Youtube as an archive, a series of video and photo-based works that appropriate amateur images posted online, reconstructing how image posting and “response”—and the online communities dedicated to their propagation— performs the mass-identified narrative of individualism that capitalism proposes. The "My Way" videos cathect issues of gender-specificity, sexual orientation, race, globalization and marketing within the larger codings of belonging and isolation, sameness and difference this vast aggregation of online video documents evokes.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

On view through April 4 at PS1 as part of "The Talent Show"

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Delta Force End Credits (2006) - Eric Yahnker

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Required Reading: The Immediated Now: Network Culture and the Poetics of Reality by Kazys Varnelis

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Throughout the 1990s, digital computing and network technologies were largely employed in office work, their cultural implications confined to niche realms for enthusiasts. If that decade’s new media art formed a vital artistic subculture, it was mainly isolated and self-referential, in part due to the artists’ fascination with hacking the medium, in part due to its position as the last in a long line of Greenbergian interrogations of the medium, and in part due to its marginalization by established art institutions. Artists like Vuk Cosic, Jodi, Alexei Shulgin, and Heath Bunting replayed early twentieth century avant-garde strategies while emulating the graphic and programming demos of 1980s hacker culture, before computers left the realm of user groups and became broadly useful in society.[1]

Today, in contrast, digital technology is an unmistakable presence in everyday life and is increasingly inextricable from mainstream social needs and conventions. Network culture is a broad sociocultural shift much like postmodernity, not limited to technological developments or to “new media.”[2] Precisely because maturing digital and networking technologies are inseparable from contemporary culture — even more than the spectacle of the television was from postmodernity — they must be read within a larger context. All art, today, is to one extent or another, networked art.

This investigation can’t be limited to online venues, but it also can’t be limited to “art.” Postmodernism called high and low into question (think of Warhol as the quintessential early postmodern artist, or later Barbara Kruger, Cindy Sherman, Jeff Koons, and Richard Prince) by bringing in products of the culture industry into art, but network culture levels that distinction utterly. Art under network culture dismisses the populist projection of the audience’s desires into art for the incorporation of the audience’s desires into art and the blurring of boundaries ...


Infinite Glitch (2011) - Ben Baker-Smith

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Every day an incomprehensible number of new digital media files are uploaded to hosting sites across the internet. Far too many for any one person to consume. Infinite Glitch is a stream-of-conciousness representation of this overwhelming flood of media, its fractured and degraded sounds and images reflecting how little we as an audience are able to retain from this daily barrage.

Infinite Glitch is an automated system that generates an ever-changing audio/video stream from the constantly increasing mass of media files freely available on the web. Source audio and video files are ripped from a variety of popular media hosting sites, torn apart, and recombined using collage and glitch techniques to create an organic, chaotic flood of sensory input.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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The Time Machine in Alphabetical Order (2010) - Thomson & Craighead

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The Time Machine in alphabetical order is a complete rendition of the 1960's film version of HG Wells Novella re-edited by us into alphabetical order from beginning to end. In doing so, we attempt to perform a kind of time travel on the movie's original time line through the use of a system of classification.

We consider this experiment as using what we have decided to call 'a constrained editing technique' in light of the literary artistic movement Oulipo who would make works through the use of constrained writing techniques.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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Originally via VVORK


REDUX (2010) - Chris Collins

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All those present at Cincinnati-based project space CS13 on Saturday, December 11th, participated in redubbing an excerpt of Jurassic Park. This included foley effects, an improvisational score, as well as dialogue. This is the result.


-- FROM THE ARTIST'S WEBSITE

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Slightly Eleven (2010) - Rene Hell

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2010 Cliparts (2010) - Oliver Laric

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