Archisuits (2005-2006) - Sarah Ross

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Archisuit consists of an edition of four leisure jogging suits made for specific architectural structures in Los Angeles. The suits include the negative space of the structures and allow a wearer to fit into, or onto, structures designed to deny them.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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deep black hole .com (2010) - Rafaël Rozendaal

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-_{}`- Wildlife (2009) - Elna Frederick

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Shake (2009) - Andrey Yazev

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Note: Works best in Safari

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Lisi Raskin's "Warning Warum" on Dia's Artists' Web Projects

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Lisi Raskin, Warning Warum, 2009 (Screengrab)

Lisi Raskin, an artist known for her whimsical military command centers and her cross-country information gathering van (official title: Mobile Observation (Transmitting and Receiving) Station), has produced a new project for Dia's ongoing Artists' Web Projects series. Titled Warning Warum, the website is a nuclear control panel that allows visitors to "bomb" locations of their choosing. The playful interface recalls Raskin's signature childlike style, complete with construction paper collages and handwritten buttons. The accompanying audio of the artist also reminds one of a kid at play, with Raskin chirping "beep beep" to replicate the sound of morse code or "oooeeewwwww" for the missile launch. Raskin's style of interface aesthetics emerges from her own upbringing in 1980s America, where the Cold War and the fear of a nuclear blast were in the air. Her low-fi reconstructions can be understood as an intentionally imprecise attempt to come to terms with the threat of nuclear disaster, an event so horrific and overwhelming as to be almost outside the realm of human comprehension.

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Printershake/Earthquake (2007/2008) - Joe Winter

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Printershake/Earthquake (Concentric Circles), 2007/2008 (8.5" x 11", shown with detail. Image courtesy of the artist.)

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Printershake/Earthquake (Performance Documentation), 2007/2008 (Image courtesy of the artist.)

For this project, artist Joe Winter aggressively shakes a computer printer during the process of printing. The movement creates the above colorful effect.

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Playing the Building (2008) - David Byrne

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(Source for image and video: Creative Time)


Creative Time presents Playing the Building, a 9,000-square-foot, interactive, site-specific installation by renowned artist David Byrne. The artist transforms the interior of the landmark Battery Maritime Building in Lower Manhattan into a massive sound sculpture that all visitors are invited to sit and “play.” The project consists of a retrofitted antique organ, placed in the center of the building's cavernous second-floor gallery, that controls a series of devices attached to its structural features—metal beams, plumbing, electrical conduits, and heating and water pipes. These machines vibrate, strike, and blow across the building’s elements, triggering unique harmonics and producing finely tuned sounds.

-- FROM THE DESCRIPTION FOR CREATIVE TIME'S PRESENTATION OF "PLAYING THE BUILDING" BY DAVID BYRNE

Note: Last year, Justin Downs wrote an article for Rhizome which outlined the design and fabrication of this project. Read it here.

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NASCAR Charger (2009) - Ron van der Ende

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Upgrade (2007) - Kelly Jazvac

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A used car is completely wrapped, inside and out, in an adhesive vinyl skin to make it look like a 2007 Porsche 911.

-- THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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Need for Speed (Cargo Cult) (2005) - Brody Condon

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Need for Speed is a Lamborghini Countach from 1985 made in cast urethane branches. The original 3D model for the car was extracted from the popular racing simulation Need for Speed. The term “cargo cult” refers to the history of low tech, ritualized simulation of military aircraft by indigenous South Pacific tribes in the mid 20th century.

-- THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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