Spatial Operating Environment "g-speak"

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g-speak overview 1828121108 from john underkoffler on Vimeo.

Claire Evans wrote an interesting article on scientist John Underkoffler's "spatial operating environment" g-speak for GOOD last week. Unlike current operating systems (Vista, Leopard, etc.) which are designed entirely around the mouse, g-speak responds to the organic human movement of the user, without a mouse. This could potentially have significant consequences for how we interface with computers, which is precisely why g-speak is so compelling. Excerpt below:

After all, computers -- with their processors, memory, graphics, and networked view of the world -- are offering us increasingly complex possibilities for translating and interacting with 1s and 0s. Yet, the way we use computers hasn’t changed appreciably since the 1980s: we still click around a screen with a mouse or track pad.

The makers of g-speak know that this sort of control doesn't take advantage of how the human brain works. According to Underkoffler, the brain regions that controls muscles, muscle memory, and proprioception (the sense of where your body is in space) and the visual system evolved to work together to deal with spatial situations. "That's why we’re all such experts at getting around and manipulating the real world," he says. "So it seems clear to us that computers should work the same way."

[ READ FULL ARTICLE ]

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IX (2008) - H3X3N

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IX @ DEADTECH 2008 from IX h3x3n on Vimeo.

IX knows 9 spells:

  1. 0N: turns computer on
  2. 4W4Y: restarts computer
  3. data_disappear: makes data disappear
  4. 3T3RN4L_R3TURN: makes data reappear
  5. 54W: cuts the operating system in half
  6. R881X0R: runs the rabbit virus
  7. M461C14NZ_H4T: catches the rabbit virus in the magician's hat
  8. T3H_0RD3R_0F_0RD3R: creates order + nonsense
  9. CH405_M4J1K: creates chaos + sense

Statement: H3X3N is a group of Computer Witches who have built an enchanted cube that casts magical spells on computers. The IX cube casts spells on Windows, Macintosh and Linux computers, hacking and hexing these operating systems. IX combines traditional stage magic tricks and irony as elements of Hacker culture to create an Interactive Installation and Software Art project.

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Processing 1.0 Launched

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Processing, the open-source programming language and production environment developed by Ben Fry and Casey Reas, turned 1.0 yesterday. While it started off as tool for sketching and teaching the fundamentals of programing, Processing has developed into a full-fledged alternative to expensive proprietary software for the creation of everything from data visualizations and interactive installations to music and video. In just 7 years, Processing has grown into one of the primary tools used by contemporary artists working on digital projects, and stands as one of the finest examples of the power of open-source development.

Visit the Processing website to download the 1.0 version and start making things!

Read more about the 1.0 Release on Casey Reas' blog.

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fragments (2008) - Tom Merrell

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Esquire.com Hosts New Game by Jason Rohrer

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Jason Rohrer, creator of Passage and Gravitation, has a new game, Between, which is now available for download through Esquire.com. Unlike his previous works, which pull their narratives from life experience -- such as one's path through birth and death in Passage and inspiration in Gravitation -- Between occupies more surreal territory. Directions are not explicit, and while a two-player game, the presence of the other player, and the correlation between players to action in the game, is obscured. The players, drifting between "wake" and "sleep", must navigate the space in order to decipher their tasks, which involve building a tower of colored blocks. The tower can only be built using certain colored blocks, and the availability of these colors is entirely dependent on the progress of the other player's tower. Thus, while the individual player's tower building seems to operate in remove from the other player, he is, in fact, reliant on their decisions in order to complete the job. The game's ambiguity sets up an interaction between players that draws on cooperation, but a cooperation that is both confusing and difficult to attain.

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One Thousand and One Biennials

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Does anyone know how many biennials there are in the world, now? There is a whole sub-field of biennial studies that looks at such issues as the economic impacts of the shows on their host cities and the artists' market values, or the relationship between Eastern biennials and Westernization. Of course, the latter question hinges on whether the show is called a "biennial" or a "biennale"... The truth is, there are now so many of these that it's easy to overlook them. Even the fledging field of electronic art has a few! But Sweden's Electrohype is a unique one, bringing ambitious installations to the beautiful Malmö Konsthall. Now in its fifth incarnation, the show draws large audiences but avoids the temptation to be a mega-show, instead opting to give serious space and consideration to good work by often more emerging artists. Electrohype 08 features ten international artists whose projects focus on "ongoing processes and time." These are Doug Back (CA), Ralf Baecker (DE), Serina Erfjord (NO), Kerstin Ergenzinger (DE), Jessica Field (CA), Voldemars Johansons (LV), Diane Morin (CA), Kristoffer Myskja (NO), Erik Olofsen (NL), and Bill Vorn (CA). While time and endurance are age-old themes in the modern art world, there's not a usual suspect in the bunch! Nonetheless, there is due notice paid to the histories and influences traced by the show. For instance, Doug Back's Sticks (1979) is showing aside Ralf Baecker's Rechnender Raum (Calculating Space) (2007). Despite a large difference in scale and nearly thirty years between them, both are kinetic sculptures fleshing out what it means to compute and how mechanics might be used to reflect upon human movement. Ironically, the big piece looks at micro-motions within the body and the smaller one looks at social interaction! Other interesting works include ...

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Tetrasomia (2000) - Stephen Vitiello

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Statement: Stephen Vitiello's first solo project for the web, Tetrasomia presents intriguing web-based archives of sounds from the natural and physical world, including such sounds as a fruit fly courtship, an underwater volcano, and poison frogs, as the source for an interactive sound project. Tetrasomia also features four new sound compositions by Vitiello: Earth, Air, Fire, and Water.

Work commissioned by Dia's ongoing web projects series.

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Winter 2006 (2006) - Dragan Espenschied

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Google Is Not The Map (2008) - Les Liens Invisibles

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Statement: Since ancient times cartography has been used to describe the world as a geometric ensemble of measurable points, lines, areas and data-labels on a plane. While the world slowly fades away in an increasingly multiplication of self-representations, the map making process - missing its real reference - becomes nothing more than an empty-meaning abstract practice: so, what do all those maps stand now for?

In order to disclose this contradiction - or just to give a paradoxical point of view about it - the imaginary art-group Les Liens Invisibles has explored the world along its self-referential techno-linguistic layers, moving through its hidden mechanisms and forcing the grammar of its public-released API code.

This project was commissioned by LX 2.0 - a project by Lisboa 20 Arte Contemporãnea and curated by Luis Silva

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The Wonder Rooms (2008) - Jess Wheelock

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