Desktop Landscapes (2009) - Peter Lemmens

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eBay TV (2008) - Steve Or Steven Read

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Ongoing series of collected photographs from eBay.com depicting televisions for sale. To market the sets, the eBay sellers also used found images. In particular I enjoy the complex interactions of the 2-dimensional screen image, its display device as a 3-dimensional product/subject, a 4th dimensional surrounding environment, your computer browser screen (the 5th dimension), and so on.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

Originally via VVORK

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TOO COOL (2010) - Nick DeMarco

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A coolness generator which transforms your photos, making you look "TOO COOL".

[Exhibition produced by jstchillin]

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ego (2007) - Ilia Ovechkin

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Lasso (2007) - Harm van den Dorpel

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Interview with DIS

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The art and design behind DIS Magazine is unlike any other fashion publication to date. Its contributors eschew the standard conventions of print publication to create an ever evolving series of related threads, organized around categories such as distaste, dystopia, discover, and dysmorphia. DIS is a collaborative project amongst artists, designers, stylists, writers and friends. They are Lauren Boyle, Solomon Chase, S. Adrian Massey III, Marco Roso, Patrik Sandberg, Nicholas Scholl, and David Toro, along with guest contributors that include artists such as Ryan Trecartin, Anna Lundh and Scott Hug. I recently conducted this Q&A via email with the members of DIS, in which they discuss the magazine's goals, its unique use of digital media technologies and the Web, and the future of the publication.

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2010: A Small Odyssey

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2010, Francesco Bonami and Gary Carrion-Murayari’s Whitney Biennial, is essentially a Whitney Biennial calibrated for the times: small at 55 artists and altogether humble. This humility, and the fact that one needn’t contend with an overwrought curatorial concept, allows viewers a more cogent experience than past, sprawling, thesis-driven Biennials could offer. Several works, rooms and motifs make good impressions. Not many are impressive enough to make an indelible impact—but a few are. Judging by the past couple decades, the task of this biennial of American art seems insurmountable, and there is no urgency to fault this edition for hitting the target and missing the bulls-eye. While the levelness here is exciting as an indicator of a playing field for post-boom artistic production, the devil’s advocate wonders, perhaps unfairly, if there isn’t something ultimately more exciting about a splashy Biennial that fails stupendously.

In the absence of an overarching conceit, why not start with a premise that did precede itself a bit: the third floor as a dedicated space for film and video. Considering the continued expansion of film and video practices throughout the art world, the idea seemed gimmicky at best—easily the curators could fill a floor, but why ghettoize? Then, come February 25, visitors stepping off the elevator and onto floor three were greeted by a tapestry by Pae White, freezing a frame of interlaced wisps of smoke in a vast expanse of fabric. Mercifully this is not a plain LCD screen (as it turns out, the floor showcases a variety of mediums), but as a piece that meditates on materiality, medium and time, it serves as an excellent banner to welcome visitors to the area of the exhibition that is most concentrated on media. The projects therein attending to these matters soar.

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P.S.1's Studio Visit

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Joy Garnett's Studio from Studio Visit

Long Island City's contemporary art center P.S.1 recently launched Studio Visit - a space for New York area artists to share a "virtual presentation" of their studio with a short artist's statement and bio. Imagine a DIY version of the Selby or Fecal Face's Studio Visits series. Like these sites, it taps into the reader's voyeuristic curiosity to see a side of the artist's process perhaps not immediately apparent in their output. The aim of Studio Visit is to promote visibility for these artists, cultivate a locally focused network and, one would assume, solicit offline studio visits as well. The initiative is in keeping with the institution's past "Greater New York" exhibition, which spotlighted work from emerging New York area artists with great breadth and success. However, like any new website, it looks like they're still sorting out the kinks. It would be helpful if they could add an RSS feed for recent submissions, so visitors don't need to check back to the site. I also noticed that quite a few artists ignored the fields in the submission form requesting photos of the interior and exterior of their studios -- it might be wise to require that as part of the process, especially if showcasing one's studio is a primary purpose of the site.

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Top 5 - 10

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title_leaving.gif Nicolas Sassoon, Leaving, 2009 (From Computers Club)

 

Ceci Moss is Rhizome's Senior Editor.


 

For my top 5-10, I've decided to pull together my favorite online exhibitions of internet-based art from the past 12 months.

► Computers Club

Each week or so, Computers Club introduce a new work by an artist. Many of the Computer Clubbers have helped to define the current crop of internet-based art influenced by Larry Cuba and Tron-style computer graphics, such as Laura Brothers, Nicholas Sassoon, and Elna Frederick.

► Internet Archaeology's "Guest Galleries"

Internet Archaeology is a site devoted to the recovery of graphic artifacts found within earlier internet culture. (Think Olia Lialina's A Vernacular Web.) Their Guest Galleries section features original work using images culled from the collection by Tabor Robak, Krist Wood, Jacob Broms Engblom, Daniel Leyva, Emma Balkind, and Nasdaq 5000. My favorite piece so far is Robak's Heaven, which I posted to Rhizome not too long ago.

► JstChillin's "Serial Chillers in Paradise"

Run by Bay Area-based artists Caitlin Denny and Parker Ito, JstChillin's "Serial Chillers in Paradise" series is quite ambitious -- for a full year, they're knocking out a new work, in the form of a solo site, by an artist every two weeks, with an accompanying essay by Denny and Ito.

► NETMARES & NETDREAMS v 2.2

Like software, the curatorial project NETMARES & NETDREAMS signal the progression of their exhibitions through versioning. The exhibition "2.2" went live last summer, and it is loosely based on beach iconography, with a gloss of dark surrealism. A sense of the ominous pervades throughout, from Harm van den Dorpel's dizzying montage of palm trees to Michael Guidetti's loop of a rippling, virtual ocean.

► Club Internet's "Dissociation"

Now closed, Club Internet's fall exhibition "Dissociation" was ...

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1 kilometer zürich hardbrücke (2008) - Luc Gut

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