Analogos 12 at Diapason October 29th at 8pm

(0)

analogos.jpg

On October 29th at 8pm, Brooklyn-based sound art gallery Diapason will host the twelfth installment of the series Analogos which is an evening specifically dedicated to "vintage" analog synthesis performances and informal discussions. Participating artists include Kabir Carter, James Fei David Galbraith, Kato Hideki, Michael J. Schumacher, Sergei Tcherepnin, Stefan Tcherepnin, and Ed Tomney.

Image: Photo by Nisi Jacobs

Link »

MORE »


Home on the ZEE[RANGE]

(0)

ZEEcloudsmall.jpg

Running through the end of December, "ZEE[RANGE]," at Pittsburgh's Wood Street Galleries, furthers Kurt Hentschlager's inquiry into the facets and limits of multi-sensory perception. The Austrian artist describes the exhibition's central work, ZEE (2008), as a "mind-scape" composed of artificial fog, stroboscopic light and adaptive surround sound. These elements conspire to efface the traditional contours of the exhibition space, replacing them with "a psychedelic architecture of pure light." An accompanying piece, RANGE (2008), makes its world premiere in this exhibition. Building upon Hentschlager's past work with 3D video game software, such as KARMA / cell (2006), RANGE presents a collection of virtual characters, contained in a small space, dividing from and agglutinating into a larger mass. Taken together, Hentschlager's latest works recall FEED (2005-6), a multi-tiered performance, created for the Theater Biennial Venice, first featuring a projection of suspended, virtual characters, followed by "a composition for artificial fog, pulse- and stroboscopic light." These seemingly unrelated modes of production thus work together, staging a condition of unreality characteristic of contemporary life and then immersing the audience in an affective simulation of this condition. But if Hentschlager's uniform, virtual mass betrays a nihilistic take on society, the subsequent dissolution of the audience into a phenomenal field may also suggest other forms of self- and collective constitution to still be possible. - Tyler Coburn

Kurt Hentschlager, ZEE, 2008

Link »

MORE »


Interactive Crowd Sourcing

(0)

zellen.jpg

While the term "crowd sourcing" generally refers to a large group of people (i.e. internet users) contributing to the realization of a project, it might also apply in interesting ways to the newest installation by Jody Zellen. In "The Blackest Spot," at LA's Fringe gallery, she culls footage of crowds and corrals them into content categories which are in turn activated by visitors to the exhibition. While the crowd is usually theorized as a single entity or herd, Zellen's selections exemplify the many different means and reasons for which people choose to assemble in a single spot. When viewers step on censor-marked spots on the floor of the gallery, they trigger audio responses linked to the gatherings, ranging from quietude to cacophony. As a result, Zellen's audience is compelled to consider their own identification with those portrayed in the collected images. - Marisa Olson

Image: Jody Zellen, The Blackest Spot, 2008

Link »

MORE »


Sounding the Alarms

(0)


Jane Philbrick's "PULL" installation, at New York's Location One gallery, is definitively interactive. Not only does it require viewer participation to really make the work happen, but it invites reflection on the agency, authority, and influence of the viewer. Flanked by walls of 502 beautifully symmetrical, gridded, illuminated fire alarms, strobes, smoke detectors, siren horns, and control panels, the installation relies on (or questions) the human impulse to pull the trigger. Once a viewer does pull on an alarm handle, loud noises, flashing lights, and loud words bombard the participant's eyes and ears in a simultaneously beautiful and overwhelming cascade. The project is intended to reflect on questions of fear and control, as well as the seductive versus destructive nature of power. Philbrick's collaboration with Honeywell Labs instigates commentary on the ways in which these issues have trickled down into architectural, industrial, and consumer devices, while upping the volume on her ongoing investigations into the subjective dimensions of language and the voice. - Marisa Olson


Image: Jane Philbrick, PULL, 2008

Link »

MORE »


Thrilling (2006) - Catherine Ross

(0)



LAUNCH

More work by Catherine Ross

MORE »


NOISE BOYS (2008) - Brace Pain

(0)

INSTRUCTIONS
1. Start these videos at the same time.
2. Mute the second video.




More videos by Brace Pain
Blog

MORE »


Cardboard Breath Guitar by Revel Woodard (2006)

(0)


MORE »


Ready and Able Art

(0)


The current exhibition at Seoul's Total Museum of Contemporary Art is a challenging one, not so much because the art is complex (though it's certainly dynamic) but because curator Byeong Sam Jeon's explicit goal is to change people's minds. "thisAbility vs. Disability" is a group show of ten projects by Korean and international artists that explore questions of human functioning and capability by addressing the senses. The show is motivated by a desire to "invite a reappraisal of disability" and assert that what many often call "'disability' is but a difference, not a defect." Invited artists Mika Fukumori; Haru Ji & Graham Wakefield; Jae Min Lee; Mian Sheng Lim (Leon); Haemin Kim; Kichul Kim; Pauline Oliveros, Leaf Miller, Zevin Polzin, & Zane Van Dusen; David Parker; Jin Wan Park & Jae Joong Lee; David Parker and Dmitry Strakovsky have created interactive works that reprogram the typical experience of an artwork, with hands seeing paintings, Braille emitting sound, one's touch generating light, and a harmonic bell that musically interprets the listener's heartbeat. Many Korean artists have been early adopters of new media and have actively pursued a relationship to science and technology in their work, but Jeon worries that many of the major exhibitions devoted to this work "have focused only on aesthetic aspects, or the novelty of the genre itself," rather than addressing bigger social and political issues. His hope, with this exhibition, is that "These artworks can spark revelations that break social prejudice and affirm difference." - Marisa Olson


Image: Haemin Kim, dot . a scene = sin? at the sea _ tactuaL [si:gak] series #2, 2008

Link »

MORE »


Walk This Way

(0)


Collaborators Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller make work that combines cinema, sound, pop culture, and the suspension of disbelief. Their sound and video walks and installations of multiple media have gained widespread international attention, in part for their ability to very closely engage individual viewers on a psychological level, and largely thanks to their command of genre conventions designed to illicit an emotional response. On view through September 28th at Edinburgh's Fruitmarket Gallery, in conjunction with the Edinburgh Art Festival, is a major survey of their work, including five pieces made since 1995 and a new project. Each of these works revolve around a viewer being more than a viewer. That is, they entice visitors to the gallery to enter a space, engaging not only with objects and sights (in a highly choreographed manner), but also with sounds and other conditions that create a unique, if sometimes tense, relationship between reality and the sensorium of the participant. While these works often involve heavy equipment (in the case of one installation, even robotics) and people taking technology into their own hands, Miller has said that the experientially-activated pieces are only as interactive as a painting or film. Instead, the duo emphasize the scripted nature of the interactions on which their pieces turn, likening them to physical cinema. If you're in the region, passing through the layers of meaning and perception created by Cardiff and Miller is highly recommended. - Marisa Olson


Image credit: The Killing Machine (2007), Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller. Materials: Mixed media, sound, pneumatics, robotics


Link »

MORE »


In the Mix

(0)


Tonight at Exit Art in New York comes a bevy of performances as part of the space's current potpourri-style exhibit Summer Mixtape Volume 1: the Get Smart edition. Critic and artist Nick Stillman will present a slide lecture on "the best art today," accompanied by sounds from noisemakers Knyfe Hyts and artist Corey D'Augustine. But afterwards some mysterious darkly-glowing strangeness will emerge with "A Network of Love," an event by Donna Huanca (aka RUA MINX), the duo of Daniel Keller and Nik Kosmas, better known as AIDS-3D, and dancer Helga Wretman. Hard details are slim, but according to the trio's own statement, expect a futuristic post-apocalyptic scenario in which "the last children of Eve struggle to maintain their digital lifestyles" after "the old systems of power have collapsed." An earlier blurb from Huanca stated that the show may include such items as drum machines, videos, sewing machines, and animals. Exit Art curators promise us there will be lasers involved; we strongly suspect there may also be black lights and phosphorescent paint. What we do know for sure is that Rhizome's own Ceci Moss will be participating in the sonic aspects of the happening, nicely rounding out the inclusion of Rhizome team members Marisa Olson and Tyler Coburn in the exhibit itself. - Ed Halter


Image: AIDS-3D, Untitled, 2008

Link »

MORE »