scrollbar (2002) - Jan Robert Leegte

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Radius (Circular) (2009) - Christopher Pappas

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Camera Ready

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Image: Sharon Lockhart, Goshogaoka, 1998. Courtesy of Blum & Poe, Los Angeles

"You have to love dancing to stick to it. It gives you nothing back, no manuscripts to store away, no paintings to hang in museums, no poems to be printed and sold, nothing but that fleeting moment when you feel alive." Those are the words of Merce Cunningham, whose death this summer—a month after the passing of Pina Bausch—provoked a wave of public musing on the difficulties of dance’s notation and preservation, as critics expressed a bleak resignation about the medium’s supposed transience. So it’s a fortunate coincidence that the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia is starting the new season with an exhibition that demonstrates what dance has “given back” to photography, film, and video. “Dance with Camera” encompasses fifty years of art—from classics like Eleanor Antin, Bruce Nauman, and Mike Kelley to emerging artists—and all the works are rooted in choreography and modernist approaches to movement. Several of the artists make work for both theaters and galleries, and their use of the camera builds on live performance rather than serving as a record of it. Choreographer Kelly Nipper considers motion’s relation to stillness by bringing dancers to her photography studio to isolate moments, while Flora Wiegmann adapts dance phrases to places outside the theater and the camera’s lens. Elad Lassry’s 16mm films exploit the metaphoric potential of the dancer’s disciplined severity, her unity of mind and body. These artists make their camera an active agent in the work, rather than a documentary device. Their concern isn’t extending a dance’s duration in memory, but expanding the capabilities of the camera through the associative and compositional possibilities of dance. The exhibition opens Friday and runs through ...

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Seth Price, Correspondence

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The following is an excerpt of an ongoing correspondence between Seth Price and Boško Blagojević.

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atoms (2009) - Derek Larson

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atoms from Derek Larson on Vimeo.

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Prepare for Overload

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Video: Ray Sweeten, Altercations (Excerpts), 2007

Issue Project Room will host two video performances by San Francisco artist Nate Boyce and New York's own Ray Sweeten this Friday September 4th. Boyce will be showing all new work, some of which was developed for a recent exhibition at Partisan Gallery, a space based in Chris Fallon's apartment in San Francisco. I caught the closing party for the Partisan show last week, and took some shots of the installation, below. Boyce's work has long been informed by an interest in the manipulation of human perception through the moving image, but his new videos operate much like subliminal advertising, where letters flash in between short, jarring segments. Sweeten's work, which often integrates the use of an oscilloscope, can be equally overpowering. For Friday, bring earplugs, shades advised.

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Image: Nate Boyce, Installation from "New Work" at Partisan Gallery, Summer 2009

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Image: Nate Boyce, Installation from "New Work" at Partisan Gallery, Summer 2009

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Required Reading

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Joep van Liefland, Video Palace # 23 - Hollywood was Yesterday, 2007

Many artists proffer a seemingly legitimate reason for being anxious about viewing copies: their works are supposed to be seen under very specific conditions in a gallery space. While this desire for “proper” installation complies with the art world’s mystificatory economy of exclusivity, which still uses as its ultimate model the unique cult image in its sacred precinct, it is of course understandable that artists would want their work to be seen under the right conditions. However, it is a mistake to think that these must be the only conditions under which a work can ever be seen. In an age in which everyone is used to seeing moving images in incredibly degraded forms online, viewers have a great capacity for “correcting” these conditions in their mind, for imagining the “proper” presentation. Seeing shaky illegal copy of the latest blockbuster on a laptop does not really damage the film; if anything, knowing that it must be so much better when seen under optimal conditions can only increase its aura.

The dialectic of de- and re-auratization is thus rather more complex than Benjamin allowed. As tempting as it may be to try to match the fervor with which he posited “right” and “wrong” ways of dealing with film—allowing it to unfold or curtailing its ontological promise, respectively—there is no reason to assume that the near future will bring us anything other than a hybrid culture in which cult value and exhibition value develop in an increasingly complex interplay. A culture, in other words, that resembles the present, but not without a little difference that is worth fighting for: an emancipation of the viewing copy, resulting in a different distribution circuit alongside that of limited editions. In such an ...

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Liquid Villa (2000) - Jeremy Blake

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Liquid Villa depicts dreamlike states using a combination of architectural and abstract imagery. I refer to this work as "time-based painting", and employ a painterly sensibility and process to create images that transform over time.

Liquid Villa begins with a series of patterns in deep, aquatic tones overlaid with an intermittent glowing vertical stripe or ray. This imagery eventually disintegrates to a view across a pool of water in an imaginary villa. This structure is in turn subsumed by a pale fog. When the fog dissipates, the scene has been reconfigured back into an abstraction. The fog, the abstract imagery, and the architecture are protean, slowly mutating into one another or recombining to create a sense of instability and unease.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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Shots Ring (Carter Tutti Remix) (2009) - Excepter

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Excepter - Shots Ring (Carter Tutti Remix) from Georgia on Vimeo.

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Sesame Street Highlights

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First airing in 1969, Sesame Street was an innovation in educational television. In addition to producing its own live action sequences, the show reached into the worlds of film and animation and commissioned work from studios such as Jeff Hale's Imagination, Inc., John and Faith Hubley's Storyboard Films, and Jim Simon's Wantu Enterprises. The program also pioneered the use of early computer graphics from the Scanimate analog computer courtesy of Dolphin Productions in New York City. All of these elements combined to create some of the most adventurous and artistic children's programming ever shown on television. Here are some highlights:


by Imagination, Inc.


by Imagination, Inc.


by Imagination, Inc.


by Imagination, Inc.


by Imagination, Inc.


by John and Faith Hubley's Storyboard Films


by Steve Finkin with Joan La Barbara


by Steve Finkin


by Owe Gustafson


by Owe Gustafson


by Jim Henson


by Jim Henson


by Frank Oz


by Wantu Enterprises
















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