Jeff Thompson
Since 2006
Works in Hoboken, New Jersey United States of America

BIO
Jeff Thompson received his BFA from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and his MFA from Rutgers University. He is currently Assistant Professor and Program Director of Visual Art & Technology at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Thompson has exhibited and performed his work internationally at venues include the Sheldon Museum of Art, the Taubman Museum of Art, SITE Santa Fe, Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, the Jersey City Museum, and the Weisman Art Museum. Recent commissions include Rhizome, Turbulence, and a project on haptic and non-visual videogames from Harvestworks.

Thompson has presented his projects at the CAA, FATE, and SECAC conferences, as well as a talk for TEDx. His visual and written projects have been published by Ugly Duckling Presse, the Parsons Journal for Information Mapping, and Leonardo Electronic Almanac (MIT Press), among others. In addition to his studio practice, Thompson is an active curator, mounting exhibitions with the Bemis Center for Contemporary Art and Art MicroPatronage, as well as through Drift Station, a curatorial collaboration that mounts international, experimental exhibitions.

You Know We're Living in the Computer Age? Computer History According to Law & Order


Artist Jeff Thompson received a Rhizome commission in 2012 for his project Computers on Law & Order, for which he watched every episode of the long-running television series and took screenshots of all the computers. Thompson will present an illustrated lecture based on the project  this Saturday, Feb 1 at 4pm at the Museum of the Moving Image, followed by a discussion with Law & Order graphic designer Kevin Raper. In this article, he shares some of his findings. 

In the fall of 1990, a television program about crime, police investigation, and criminal trials named Law & Order aired for the first time. The show eventually ended in 2010, tied with Gunsmoke for the longest-running live-action television show at 20 seasons and 456 episodes.[1] With its unique (and consistent) style and trademark "dun-dun!" sound, Law & Order has generated several spin-offs and can likely be found playing at any hour of the day somewhere on cable.[2]