marc garrett
Since the beginning
Works in London United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

ARTBASE (1)
PORTFOLIO (3)
BIO
Marc Garrett is co-director and co-founder, with artist Ruth Catlow of the Internet arts collectives and communities – Furtherfield.org, Furthernoise.org, Netbehaviour.org, also co-founder and co-curator/director of the gallery space formerly known as 'HTTP Gallery' now called the Furtherfield Gallery in London (Finsbury Park), UK. Co-curating various contemporary Media Arts exhibitions, projects nationally and internationally. Co-editor of 'Artists Re:Thinking Games' with Ruth Catlow and Corrado Morgana 2010. Hosted Furtherfield's critically acclaimed weekly broadcast on UK's Resonance FM Radio, a series of hour long live interviews with people working at the edge of contemporary practices in art, technology & social change. Currently doing an Art history Phd at the University of London, Birkbeck College.

Net artist, media artist, curator, writer, street artist, activist, educationalist and musician. Emerging in the late 80′s from the streets exploring creativity via agit-art tactics. Using unofficial, experimental platforms such as the streets, pirate radio such as the locally popular ‘Savage Yet Tender’ alternative broadcasting 1980′s group, net broadcasts, BBS systems, performance, intervention, events, pamphlets, warehouses and gallery spaces. In the early nineties, was co-sysop (systems operator) with Heath Bunting on Cybercafe BBS with Irational.org.

Our mission is to co-create extraordinary art that connects with contemporary audiences providing innovative, engaging and inclusive digital and physical spaces for appreciating and participating in practices in art, technology and social change. As well as finding alternative ways around already dominating hegemonies, thus claiming for ourselves and our peer networks a culturally aware and critical dialogue beyond traditional hierarchical behaviours. Influenced by situationist theory, fluxus, free and open source culture, and processes of self-education and peer learning, in an art, activist and community context.
Discussions (1712) Opportunities (15) Events (175) Jobs (2)
DISCUSSION

Plantoid: the blockchain-based art that makes itself


Plantoid: the blockchain-based art that makes itself

Rob Myers reviews Okhaos' "Plantoid" (2015), art that makes itself - with a little help from the blockchain and human artists.

Plantoid (2015) by Okhaos is a self-creating, self-propagating artwork system that uses blockchain technology to gather and manage the resources it needs to become real and to participate in the artworld. Structured as a Decentralised Autonomous Organization (DAO), once it is set in motion the code of the Plantoid system combines the functions of artwork, artist and art dealer in a single piece of software.

https://t.co/SEUO88gSAc

DISCUSSION

Know Your Filesystem (and how it affects you)


Know Your Filesystem (and how it affects you)

Dave Young writes about the context of Localhost: RWX, a symposium and worksession at Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop from 29-31 October 2015. He explores how the filesystem mediates our everyday use of computer interfaces, shaping our interactions with our data and digital tools.

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/know-your-filesystem-and-how-it-affects-you

Dave Young (IE) is an artist and researcher based in Edinburgh. His practice follows critical research into digital culture, manifested through workshops, website development, and talks on subjects varying from cybernetics and the Cold War history of network technologies, to issues around copyright and open source/free culture.

He is founder of Localhost, a forum for discussing, dismantling and disrupting network technologies, with past events focusing on Google's entry into media art curation, and the role of analog radio as a potential commons in the digital age. He has presented workshops and given talks at institutions and festivals internationally, including at Edinburgh College of Art, V2 Rotterdam, Furtherfield, LiWoLi, and Transmediale. Localhost: http://l-o-c-a-l-h-o-s-t.com

DISCUSSION

Does the blockchain lead to more transparency in art?


Does the blockchain lead to more transparency in art?

The blockchain grants the author the exclusive right to reproduce, publish, and sell the content and its intellectual property. How does the art scene react to these new technological developments?

To find out more, Annette Doms asks Alain Servais (collector), Wolf Lieser (gallerist) and Aram Bartholl (artist.)

http://bit.ly/1jwMMsX

DISCUSSION

Crypto 2.0 and DAWCs | By Rob Myers


Crypto 2.0 and DAWCs | By Rob Myers

#artdatamoney #bitcoin #blockchain #cryptocurrency

The Anarcho-Capitalist future utopia of post-Bitcoin Crypto 2.0 systems meet the historical organizational forms of Socialism. Rob Myers brings the trustless code of Decentralized Autonomous Organizations into contrast with the very human activity of Workers' Councils.

http://bit.ly/1NGJCiM

DISCUSSION

Set of rules, online interactions and feminism: Interview with Angela Washko


Filippo Lorenzin interviews artist Angela Washko about her performances within the virtual space of World of Warcraft, the connections with Situationism and Feminism. http://bit.ly/1GaU6Ez

Angela Washko is an artist, writer and facilitator devoted to creating new forums of discussions in spaces most hostile towards feminism. She is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Carnegie Mellon University. Since 2012, Washko has also been facilitating The Council on Gender Sensitivity and Behavioral Awareness in World of Warcraft, her most known project: it’s a series of actions taken within the virtual space of World of Warcraft (“WoW”), an online video game set in a fantasy universe in which people play as orcs, knights and wizards. Her research is focused on the social relations between the gamers, with great attention towards on how these relate with feminism and women, who are becoming more and more numerous between the players of this game. Washko investigates also how design elements of the game influence the relationships of the people who inhabit it; it’s a social study on a community expanding more and more widely, and acts within a limited set of rules designed by video game producers.